Libraries

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Late Night Pondering

    Agnostic, Maybe
    Andy
    10 Aug 2014 | 11:25 pm
    A couple of questions have been rattling around my mind over the last week or so. It’s the kind of stuff that lurks in the background and creeps into your mind in the moments between things like commuting to and from work and trying to go to sleep. As you might tell from the time when this is posted, it has been keeping me up to the point where the bed becomes the sum of all irritations: too warm to lay on, the pillows aren’t right, and the sheets won’t settle just right. But enough about that. A few days ago, I sent out a tweet asking if libraries are moving towards…
  • OCLC's Results from the International Linked Data Survey for Implementers

    The Distant Librarian
    Paul R. Pival
    9 Sep 2014 | 8:18 am
    OCLC's Hanging Together blog has just concluded a really interesting series of posts analyzing the responses they got to a recent survey on implementation of linked data projects. If you're at all interested in the semantic web, you really should check out the series: Many thanks to all of you who participated in the international linked data survey for implementers or disseminated the survey link! I’ve been summarizing the results in a series of HangingTogether posts, which just concluded today:  Linked Data Survey results 1 – Who’s doing it Linked Data Survey results 2 –…
  • 50 Library Stories You May Have Missed in September

    OEDB.org
    Ellyssa Kroski
    9 Oct 2014 | 4:23 am
    September was back-to-school and back to writing for many librarians.  Blogs, journals, and news outlets were jam-packed with library and information stories ranging from articles about makerspaces, digital collections, 3D printing, and free technology for libraries as well as some offbeat topics such as medieval selfies and snapchats from Harry Potter!  Check out these 50 posts, infographics, and articles to get you caught up on what’s happening in the LIS world. 15 Geeky Back-to-School Supplies 28 Snapchats From Harry Potter Stay Focused! 5 Tools to Avoid Distractions Polling the…
  • Designing libraries that are relevant in the digital age

    The Distant Librarian
    Paul R. Pival
    20 Oct 2014 | 9:28 am
    Got a free 1/2 hour? Use it to listen to a recent episode of The Current, Designing libraries that are relevant in the digital age, which is mostly about the new Halifax Central Public Library.  No mention of Calgary's new Central Library, but I guess that's 'cause it's not nearly so far along.  Glass seems to be the thing, though!
  • A Library Battle in the Cornhusker State

    Annoyed Librarian
    Annoyed Librarian
    23 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    There’s a fight brewing in Omaha, Nebraska of all places. I say “of all places” because from a distance Omaha seems like a calm place. Maybe it’s all those Mutual of Omaha commercials I saw as a child. Omaha is reassuring. Nevertheless, the mayor is fighting against the library of all places. I say “of [...]
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    David Lee King

  • Nice Book Review of my book Face2Face!

    David Lee King
    21 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    The Teachers College Record just reviewed my book Face2Face: Using Facebook, Twitter, and Other Social Media Tools to Create Great Customer Connections. It’s unfortunately behind a paywall now, but it’s a nice book review! Here are some snippets from the review: At a time when social networking is often criticized for driving humans apart, King’s book is upbeat and suggests that we have more of an opportunity to connect in authentic ways with others than ever before, both on a personal and organizational level. While of course nothing can substitute for true “face-to-face”…
  • Change, Adaptation, and Revolutions in Libraries – my MLA2014 talk

    David Lee King
    15 Oct 2014 | 6:30 am
    Last week, I gave the opening keynote presentation at the Missouri Library Association‘s annual conference. Fun stuff! My talk swirled around the topics of changes taking place in the library and the technology world; services and processes that we need to adapt in order to be a modern library; and how to start small and larger revolutions in your library and in your job. Here are my slides – enjoy! Related PostsNewest Freak Out, Geek Out, Seek Out PresentationFace2Face – my Handheld Librarian 7 PresentationThe Beginning of the New NormalReminders for Frequent SpeakersYour…
  • Library Time – a song and video from my Library

    David Lee King
    9 Oct 2014 | 1:20 pm
    The short version: My library wrote and recorded a song, and here’s the Youtube video for it! You can also: Download the song from iTunes Listen to the song on Soundcloud Visit the library’s website for more information  Longer version: Why did we do this? Earlier this year, my library remodeled the kids area of the library and rebranded it the Kids Library. Part of our grand opening included some of our YA staff writing a song, and library staff performed the song at the grand opening (I played drums! Video here). Our Marketing Director liked the song so much that she sent the…
  • Guidelines for our Makerspace

    David Lee King
    7 Oct 2014 | 7:30 am
    The team of staff working on my library’s makerspace gave some good thought to policies, procedures, and more functional guidelines for use of the space and equipment. For policies … well, we don’t have any. Other policies like our customer behavior policy and our computer use policy really cover everything we need. So we have a list of more functional “procedures” that can change as the space changes. Here’s what we have so far. MakeIT Lab Procedures Customers: Normal customer behavioral guidelines apply “Respect the space, respect the staff, respect…
  • Equipment for my Library’s Makerspace

    David Lee King
    30 Sep 2014 | 6:30 am
    My library is putting the final touches on our fledgling makerspace/digital media lab. It opens December 8, assuming all the details fall into place! I thought it might be interesting to do a few posts on our plans – to share equipment ideas, policies and guidelines, and planning – in hopes that someone else will find it useful. We are calling it the MakeIT Lab. Our goal is to allow customers to use computers and digital technology to make stuff, including: edit and manipulate photos create digital art create and edit videos record music, podcasts, and oral histories transfer…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Agnostic, Maybe

  • Say Yes No Maybe So To Privacy

    Andy
    7 Oct 2014 | 5:57 pm
    I honestly don’t know whether to laugh, cry, or just let the apathy take over me when it comes to libraries and their relations to vendor that collect usage information. It must be active cognitive dissonance in which we tout the confidential nature of patron records, the freedom to read anonymously, and the actions we will take (up to and including jail and legal proceedings) but let such data slip through our fingers first with database providers, then with social media, and finally now with the landscape of apps. It’s either that librarians aren’t serious about principles of privacy…
  • Banned Books Beast 2014

    Andy
    21 Sep 2014 | 7:04 pm
    Once again, Banned Books Week is upon the library world and this year I find myself disappointed. This is my sixth annual entry on the event, the only consistent thing I’ve written about throughout my blogging years. I’ve been thinking about writing this blog entry for a week, a constant companion in my quiet moments traveling between home and work, doing chores around the apartment, and in that short span of consciousness laying in bed before sleep. Unlike other things that would have developed in blog posts in the past, this one pestered me to finally put fingers to the keyboard. My…
  • Rocket Ship to the Moon

    Andy
    22 Aug 2014 | 10:04 am
    I didn’t make it through the entire Cosmos series when it was on television, but there was something in the first coupe of episodes I watched that stuck with me. The concept of the observable universe is something I’ve known, but the thought that there could be things beyond that had never crossed my mind. To imagine that the universe could be older than the oldest light we have measured simply because that light has not yet arrived was a mind blower. It’s a simple yet powerful thought that reminds me of the limits of human observation. The concept of radical librarianship has come up…
  • Late Night Pondering

    Andy
    10 Aug 2014 | 11:25 pm
    A couple of questions have been rattling around my mind over the last week or so. It’s the kind of stuff that lurks in the background and creeps into your mind in the moments between things like commuting to and from work and trying to go to sleep. As you might tell from the time when this is posted, it has been keeping me up to the point where the bed becomes the sum of all irritations: too warm to lay on, the pillows aren’t right, and the sheets won’t settle just right. But enough about that. A few days ago, I sent out a tweet asking if libraries are moving towards…
  • Shifting Gears

    Andy
    21 Jul 2014 | 6:55 pm
    "If you would not be forgotten, as soon as you are dead and rotten, either write things worth reading, or do things worth the writing." - Ben Franklin My brother used to have this quote hanging on the wall in his room when we were growing up. As he wanted to be a writer (which I’m happy to say that he is), it was a reminder to keep working on his craft and create stories and novels worth reading. It’s a writer’s version of Ranganathan’s law of “save the time of the reader” by working hard to make it worthy of the reader’s attention and effort. I’d like to think that…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Librarian in Black Blog – Sarah Houghton

  • Adobe Spies on eBook Readers, including Library Users

    Sarah
    7 Oct 2014 | 9:31 am
    A story broke yesterday involving eBooks, libraries, and the privacy of user data. Reporter Nate Hoffelder exposed some serious privacy violations on the part of Adobe, specifically within their Digital Editions 4 product. Adobe Digital Editions, which most eBook platforms in libraries use (including OverDrive, 3M Cloud Library, Axis 360, and Enki), has been secretly spying on users. No one hacked anything–this is the company itself collecting this data on the sly. Adobe is gathering data on the eBooks that have been opened, which pages were read, and in what order–including…
  • Laundry and Skeletons: The Reality of Sexual Assault and Harassment

    Sarah
    3 Oct 2014 | 2:24 pm
    Trigger Warning: This post includes discussions and descriptions of sexual harassment and assault, as well as descriptions of the mental state of someone suffering abuse. On Halloween day of 2011, I wrote a blog post detailing the years of harassment I had experienced at the hands of fellow librarians. I did not include every incident. I did not talk about harassment that happened to me outside of the library world. And I did not name names. This post gained a lot of traction and I was pleased that it helped contribute in some small way to the conversations that ultimately resulted in…
  • Team Harpy FAQ

    Sarah
    1 Oct 2014 | 8:50 pm
    Many people have had questions about the lawsuit filed by Joseph Murphy against nina de jesus and Lisa Rabey, and about #teamharpy. Here is an attempt to answer the most common questions so that we can all start from an informed position. What is Team Harpy all about? Joseph Murphy (aka Joe Murphy) has begun legal proceedings naming nina de jesus and Lisa Rabey as defendants in a defamation lawsuit in the Canadian courts, asking for a total of $1.25 million in damages. All three are librarians. Mr. Murphy claims that nina and Lisa: “have injured his personal and professional reputation,…
  • I Stand with Team Harpy

    Sarah
    23 Sep 2014 | 2:12 pm
    I support #teamharpy wholeheartedly. Team Harpy is a rapidly growing group of people who support an individual’s rights to call out the harassing behavior of another individual. Namely, Team Harpy supports the rights of Lisa Rabey and nina de jesus to speak about the behavior of Joe Murphy, a fellow librarian.  Why are they called Team Harpy? In the early days of this story, they were called harpies by some opinionated individuals. This is the TL;DR version of the story to date. 1.      Earlier this year in 2014, Lisa Tweeted and nina wrote a blog post about the prevailing issue…
  • California Library Leadership Failed

    Sarah
    29 Aug 2014 | 11:26 am
    Last Friday, August 22nd, the California State Senate voted unanimously to confirm Governor Brown’s nomination of Greg Lucas as California State Librarian. When Lucas was nominated I had some things to say. I wrote letters to senators, reached out to CLA leadership, and talked extensively with other California librarians about the nomination. Now that Lucas has been confirmed I have some more things to say. I cannot overemphasize that I have no negative feelings toward Greg Lucas whatsoever. Although his lack of education and experience in libraries (or anything library-related, or…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Swiss Army Librarian

  • Check Out This Telescope!

    Brian Herzog
    23 Oct 2014 | 8:10 am
    I totally dropped the ball and am late in posting this. However, my library was featured in the October issue of Sky & Telescope magazine! The article focused on a practical program for circulating telescopes from a public library. Thanks to the generous donation from local astronomy buffs, we've been circulating two telescopes for about the last six month. The photo above appeared in the article, showing library staff checking out a telescope to patrons. The article goes into detail about the best telescopes for library use (that is, easy-to-use and hard-to-damage), how to prepare them,…
  • Reference Question of the Week – 10/12/14

    Brian Herzog
    18 Oct 2014 | 6:49 am
    So this is an interesting question - and a situation where I got schooled in applying Occam's razor to research techniques. A friend of mine at work had an unusual coin, and we wanted to find out what it was. It didn't have any English lettering on it, and no Arabic numbers, although it clearly looked like it was a coin from the Middle East or Asia, or maybe North Africa (however, the lack of Arabic numbers made me think it wasn't from an Arab country). This came up late on a Friday, so I never got a chance to search for what it was. Over the weekend though, I did think about different…
  • Why Your Privacy Matters, Even If You’re Not “Doing Anything Wrong”

    Brian Herzog
    15 Oct 2014 | 7:38 am
    One of the anti-privacy arguments that I hate - hate - is the idea that people who are not doing anything wrong shouldn't mind pervasive surveillance. The video below is Glenn Greenwald's TED talk on why that is complete crap, and on the larger issue of why privacy is vital to normal human life. It's a 20 minute video, with Greenwald's talk the first 15 minutes and then some question and answer afterward. It is 20 minutes well-spent. Privacy is of course paramount in libraries, and this talk clearly parallels why librarians care so much about it.
  • Reference Question of the Week – 10/5/14

    Brian Herzog
    11 Oct 2014 | 10:15 am
    One Saturday I was working at the desk with a coworker. She answered the phone, and it was a patron asking for a print of Winslow Homer's "Fishing the Falls." He said it's not one of his public works, and is in a private collection, and that's why he can't find any information about it online. After my coworker hung up, she spent some time looking for it. After a little while with no success, she asked me to help - and then left for lunch. Slackers. It didn't appear in the index of any of our Homer books in the 700s, but by searching for "fishing the falls" and "winslow homer" I did find a…
  • A Couple of Minor Interesting Things

    Brian Herzog
    9 Oct 2014 | 6:24 am
    I know there are significant issues coming to light this week regarding security and privacy, but this post highlights two far less consequential items. Both are search tips from Lifehacker. 1. Searching for Lyrics The first is that Bing Now Shows Lyrics at the Top of Your Search Results. This will actually be extremely useful, because I haven't felt comfortable about visiting a lyrics website since about 2000. I don't know why those always seem to be the most virus- and crap-prone websites, but they are. Of course this doesn't work for every song. In fact, quite literally while I still had…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    ACRLog

  • Appreciating Open Access Advocates

    Maura Smale
    20 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Happy Open Access Week, everyone! Though maybe it’s not the happiest of weeks this year… Last Friday the news broke about the appeal of the Georgia State University e-reserves case. It looks like many of the rulings in favor of fair use from the initial suit may be overturned, though it’s not certain exactly how things will shake out yet. Kevin Smith, Scholarly Communications Officer at Duke University, shared a few early thoughts on his blog, and Nancy Sims, Copyright Program Librarian at the University of Minnesota, wrote a longer post discussing the ruling. I’m sure…
  • Intentional teaching, intentional learning: Toward threshold concepts through reflective practice

    acrlguest
    13 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    ACRLog welcomes a guest post from Jennifer Jarson, Information Literacy and Assessment Librarian at Muhlenberg College. This fall marked the start of my tenth academic year as a librarian. It startles me, to say the least, to count up the years and arrive at (almost) ten. Having spent the majority of my career so far at a small college, I’ve been fortunate to be involved in a wide variety of projects. As a public services librarian, though, my attention has most frequently been directed to reference, instruction, and all things information literacy. It’s no surprise that, six-ish weeks…
  • Handling It: Under New Management

    Maura Smale
    6 Oct 2014 | 10:00 am
    I’ve recently moved into a new role at the college library where I work. Our former Chief Librarian retired, and I applied for the job and was appointed as the new Chief at the beginning of the semester. My new job is exciting and challenging — I’m fortunate to continue to work with my terrific colleagues in the library and at a college in which the faculty and administration view the library as a valued partner. While I miss the teaching I did as Instruction Coordinator, I hope to be able to add some instruction back into my days once I get more settled. As Steven has…
  • Assisting College Military Veterans in Academic Libraries

    acrlguest
    29 Sep 2014 | 8:00 am
    ACRLog welcomes a guest post from Alejandro Marquez, Undergraduate Outreach and Instruction Librarian at North Dakota State University. Student retention has been a big issue here on the North Dakota State University (NDSU) campus. My position was recently created within the library to work as a cooperative liaison with other on-campus support services and entities to address this issue, such as the tutoring center, disability services, and the counseling center, among others. This collaborative environment has sparked a positive conversation in our library that is focused on how to redefine…
  • All the News, In Print

    Maura Smale
    22 Sep 2014 | 9:00 am
    My household recently started getting the print edition of our local newspaper again. I know what you’re thinking: Really? Print? In 2014? When everyone in the house is fortunate enough to have a device on which they could read the electronic version (if they were so inclined)? I’m old enough that I’ve spent most of my life getting the news from a print newspaper until relatively recently. When I moved into an apartment with friends halfway through college, ordering up daily newspaper delivery made it seem like we were truly adults despite a diet consisting mostly of boxed…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Distant Librarian

  • Designing libraries that are relevant in the digital age

    Paul R. Pival
    20 Oct 2014 | 9:28 am
    Got a free 1/2 hour? Use it to listen to a recent episode of The Current, Designing libraries that are relevant in the digital age, which is mostly about the new Halifax Central Public Library.  No mention of Calgary's new Central Library, but I guess that's 'cause it's not nearly so far along.  Glass seems to be the thing, though!
  • Amazon.ca now supported by Library Extension for Chrome

    Paul R. Pival
    6 Oct 2014 | 10:42 am
    Following up on a post from earlier this summer, the developer of this excellent extension for Chrome has now updated it to include Amazon.ca. (And the University of Calgary) Remember to choose your library(ies) from the Options menu in Tools / Extensions:
  • OCLC's Results from the International Linked Data Survey for Implementers

    Paul R. Pival
    9 Sep 2014 | 8:18 am
    OCLC's Hanging Together blog has just concluded a really interesting series of posts analyzing the responses they got to a recent survey on implementation of linked data projects. If you're at all interested in the semantic web, you really should check out the series: Many thanks to all of you who participated in the international linked data survey for implementers or disseminated the survey link! I’ve been summarizing the results in a series of HangingTogether posts, which just concluded today:  Linked Data Survey results 1 – Who’s doing it Linked Data Survey results 2 –…
  • Design presentation for Calgary's New Central Library

    Paul R. Pival
    8 Sep 2014 | 8:22 am
    I ended up not being able to attend this presentation in person, but there's now a nicely-edited video of last week's presentation on the design of Calgary's New Central Library. You can watch the preliminaries, but I recommend starting at the 8:15 mark where the interesting design discussion actually begins, IMHO. 
  • ERIC Webinar: Restoring Access to ERIC's PDFs

    Paul R. Pival
    4 Sep 2014 | 1:17 pm
    In August 2012, ERIC temporarily disabled access to its collection of full text documents due to personally identifiable information found in some of its older documents. Over the past two years, the ERIC team has worked to clear and re-release many of the documents.   ERIC will be hosting a webinar on September 16, 2014 from 1:00–2:30 p.m. EDT to answer many of the questions that have been asked about this process, such as:  Why did ERIC remove access to full text documents? What process did the ERIC team use to restore the PDFs? Why did it take almost two years for ERIC to restore…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Pattern Recognition

  • Knight Foundation News Challenge Semi-Finalist

    griffey
    21 Oct 2014 | 2:34 pm
    I found out this morning that my Knight Foundation News Challenge entry (Make the Things that Measure the Future: Libraries & Open Hardware) was chosen as a semi-finalist! Out of 680 initial proposals there are now 41 proposals left in the “Refinement” stage. We have a week to answer a new series of questions, along with responding to any comments or questions that were generated by our initial proposal. The Knight questions are: Who are the users of your project, and what have you learned from them so far? What are the obstacles to implementing your idea, and how will you…
  • LibraryBox wins Excellence in Education at Chattanooga Startup Awards

    griffey
    10 Oct 2014 | 8:42 am
    Last night were the first annual Chattanooga Startup Awards, a part of Startup Week. About a week or so ago I got an email letting me know that LibraryBox was a finalist for an award, and could I please send them a logo and a song I’d like played if we won. First: I got a theme song. That’s just cool. Second: I assumed it was a formality that LibraryBox wouldn’t win. There are so many awesome companies and people doing stuff in Chattanooga that I was certain I’d go to the awards, talk to a few other nominees, and have a beer. The last thing I thought would happen was…
  • Adobe Digital Editions and infoleaks

    griffey
    8 Oct 2014 | 8:20 pm
    The online library world exploded today over the revelation that Adobe Digital Editions, software that is required for many library-focused eBook services, evidently leaks like a sieve when it comes to our user’s information. The TL:DR version of the story is that ADE appears to be sending in plain text to Adobe’s servers information such as: the book you are reading, title, publisher, which pages you have read and which page you are currently on. Much longer discussions about the leak and potential fallout here: Nate Hoffelder at the Digital Reader broke the story Ars Technica…
  • Support the Ada Initiative

    griffey
    10 Sep 2014 | 4:41 am
    Like many librarians, today I’m blogging about a fundraiser for a group that I think does incredibly important and useful work in the technology world: The Ada Initiative. Named after one of my heroes, Ada Lovelace, it is a group that is dedicated to supporting women in technology. They do this in a variety of ways, from advocacy, to the development of codes of conduct and the promotion of safe spaces for women, to education for organizations and individuals about gender diversity and the skills needed to support these efforts. The Ada Initiative can only do these things through the…
  • Apple’s September 9th 2014 Announcement Predictions

    griffey
    8 Sep 2014 | 7:02 am
    Over the years, I’ve become known as a fan of Apple’s hardware and software solutions…and it’s true, I am overly fond of the way they do things. This isn’t to say that I’m not critical of them, as I do think they make mistakes (iPod HiFi anyone?). But I’ve been following them for many, many years and have a good understanding of their predilections. On September 9th, Apple will be holding a press event that is promising to be one of the most interesting in many years. September is always their biggest press event of the year, as it’s when they…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    ResearchBuzz

  • Odia, Names, Google, More: Morning Buzz, October 20th, 2014

    researchbuzz
    20 Oct 2014 | 3:30 am
    A new tool data mines donor information and tells you if your name is liberal or conservative. “The ratings are determined by how often someone with a specific name donates to liberal or conservative politicians. (To arrive at the top 20 names in each group, Crowdpac’s number crunchers did some extra work, looking at names associated with at least 1,000 donations since 1980 to exclude outliers.)” Be sure to do all iterations of a name; according to this tool “Mike” is more conservative than “Michael.” John Overholt has a new blog curating early versions…
  • Whisper, TwitPic, BBC, More: Morning Buzz, October 19th, 2014

    researchbuzz
    19 Oct 2014 | 3:29 am
    Hey! Use Google Sheets to have multi-lingual chats. From Amit Agarwal, of course. FamilySearch keeps adding those records. “States. Notable collection updates include the 2,694,665 images from the Slovakia, Church and Synagogue Books, 1592-1910, collection; the 2,785,409 images from the US, New Jersey, State Census, 1915, collection; and the 2,155,570 indexed records from the US, Ohio, County Death Records, 1840-2001, collection.” The ALA has archived its Ebola Webinar and made it available online. Google is rolling out another search update in an attempt to downrank sites…
  • Mocavo, Antique Pianos, Philadelphia, More: Morning Buzz, October 18th, 2014

    researchbuzz
    18 Oct 2014 | 3:56 am
    Mocavo is having an open access weekend. IFTTT used to have great Twitter triggers that they had to shut down in 2012 because Twitter treats third-party developers like crap. Anyway, IFTTT now has much better Twitter triggers. “…today’s rollout brings additional recipes which let you query deeper into Twitter’s stream, instead of only focusing on your own actions. These new triggers are far more useful, too. They can serve as a valuable research tool, allowing to you to do things like track a hashtag or keyword and turn that into a spreadsheet of tweets, or input that info…
  • Facebook, Ireland, Vintage Ads, More: Fat Afternoon Buzz, October 17th, 2014

    researchbuzz
    17 Oct 2014 | 12:26 pm
    Now available: an online archive of letters from Irish soldiers during World War I. “The archive, is a collection of 453 letters from 56 servicemen who wrote to Dublin woman Monica Roberts in acknowledgement of practical gifts she sent to them during the First World War. It has been published in a fully searchable online database of text and images on http://www.dublinheritage.ie.” The Daily Ranger of Wyoming has put its photo archive online. The Law Library of Congress is going to offer free access to some historical legal materials from HeinOnline. “These materials can be…
  • Firefox, Charts, More: Short Morning Buzz, October 17th, 2014

    researchbuzz
    17 Oct 2014 | 8:06 am
    Moving your Web site? Google has updated its change-of-address tool. Now available: Firefox 33. “Mozilla today officially launched Firefox 33 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android. Major additions include OpenH264 support as well as the ability to send video content from webpages to a second screen.” From Sitepoint: 5 tools for creating online charts. There’s a a new online archive of Washington DC photographs. The BBC has launched the BBC Genome project – see what was showing on the Beeb the day you were born! “Fancy knowing the TV schedule from the day you were…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal» Academic Libraries

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Court Reverses Ruling on Publishers vs. Georgia State E-Reserve Case

    Lisa Peet
    20 Oct 2014 | 8:12 am
    On October 17 the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit in Atlanta unanimously reversed the District Court’s ruling on the Publishers v. Georgia State University (GSU) Fair Use Case. In the suit, which was filed in April 2008, three academic publishers—Cambridge University Press, Oxford University Press, and Sage Publications—argued that Georgia State University’s use of their material for electronic course reserves exceeded fair use limitations and infringed on their copyrights. After the suit was filed, GSU changed its e-reserve policy and adopted a fair use checklist to help…
  • Redefining What Discovery Means | Peer to Peer Review

    Barbara Fister
    16 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    A recent Ithaka report by Roger Schonfeld asks “Does Discovery Still Happen in the Library?” My immediate thought was “did it ever?” quickly followed by “why do we assume it should?” Once upon a time, in a pre-Internet era, libraries were seen as more central to searching for information than they are today, because back then information was scarce. Even so, discovery (which Schonfeld defines as “the process and infrastructure required for a user to find an appropriate item”) was only sometimes facilitated by the library. A large part of discovery for scholars and…
  • Lessons from Swets: Libraries Need Subscription Security | Peer to Peer Review

    Kevin L. Smith
    9 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    I participated in a series of meetings last week to determine how the Duke Libraries would respond to the bankruptcy filing made by subscription agent Swets. We have been through this before, when Faxon/RoweCom failed, and many libraries lost a lot of money. Unfortunately, more money is going to be lost this time around. Perhaps it is time for us to think about how we got into this situation——and how to make sure we never end up back here again. First, and this cannot be said loudly enough, we should not send any more subscription money to Swets. When Faxon went belly-up, some libraries…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal Reviews

  • Read Along with Lonely Planet’s Best Travel in 2015 | Xpress Reviews

    LJ Reviews
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:48 am
    Week ending October 24, 2014 Lonely Planet’s Best in Travel 2015: The Best Trends, Destinations, Journeys & Experiences for the Year Ahead. Lonely Planet. 2014. 208p. photos. maps. index. ISBN 9781743603628. pap. $14.99. TRAV This tenth edition of Lonely Planet’s Best in Travel, with its beautiful color photographs and enthusiastic commentary, continues to offer inspiration to the neophyte traveler looking to find new destinations. From the more traditional (Ireland, London, Vienna) to the less visited (Nepal, Namibia, Tasmania), the guide provides a brief paragraph on the location…
  • Audiobooks from Chase, Finder, Hubbard, and McEwen & Koloniar| Xpress Reviews

    LJ Reviews
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:37 am
    Week ending October 24, 2014 Chase, Loretta. Silk Is for Seduction. 9 CDs. library ed. unabridged. 11½ hrs. Tantor Audio. 2014. ISBN 9781494501112. $39.99; 1 MP3-CD. retail ed. F The Duke of Clevedon has very nearly sown his last oat and seems to be resigned to return home to ask his childhood sweetheart, Clara, for her hand in marriage. The ton is watching and speculating about the match, but Marcelline Noirot, the self-proclaimed best dress designer in the world, is watching and speculating for different reasons. Marcelline and her sisters own a dress shop and dressing the Duke’s new…
  • Graphic Novels: Watch out for Works by MariNaomi | Xpress Reviews

    LJ Reviews
    23 Oct 2014 | 6:23 am
    Week ending October 24, 2014 MariNaomi (text & illus.). Dragon’s Breath and Other True Stories. Uncivilized. 2014. 384p. ISBN 9781941250013. pap. $24.95. MEMOIR Following her highly successful graphic memoir Kiss & Tell, MariNaomi returns with another batch of autobiographical comics. As in the novelist’s previous work, she devotes quite a bit of content to the highs and lows of relationships, but this anthology also includes childhood memories and slice-of-life observations delivered with the same poignant touch. Many of these stories first appeared online, and those origins can…
  • Fiction from Dunn, Hazelgrove, Horowitz, Maxwell, Pérez-Reverte, & St. Aubyn | Xpress Reviews

    LJ Reviews
    23 Oct 2014 | 6:03 am
    Week ending October 24, 2014 Dunn, Matthew. Dark Spies: A Spycatcher Novel. Morrow. Oct. 2014. 384p. ISBN 9780062309464. $26.99; ebk. ISBN 9780062309471. F In Dunn’s fourth novel (after Slingshot) featuring superspy Will Cochrane, Will goes from being the hunter to being hunted. As a top-level agent working both for the CIA and Britain’s MI6, Will is part of a classified project jeopardized when an international operation goes awry. He acts against orders to save another agent’s life, and the CIA decides he is the one to blame for the resulting fallout. The target of a global manhunt by…
  • Latin American History, October 2014 | Best Sellers

    LJ Reviews
    23 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    January 2014 to date as identified by YBP Library Services The Empire of Necessity: Slavery, Freedom, and Deception in the New World Grandin, Greg Metropolitan: Henry Holt 2014. ISBN 9780805094534. $30 A World Not To Come: A History of Latino Writing and Print Culture Coronado, Raúl Harvard University Press 2013. ISBN 9780674072619. $49.95 Cruel Modernity Franco, Jean Duke University Press 2013. ISBN 9780822354420. $89.95 The Structure of Cuban History: Meanings and Purpose of the Past Perez, Louis A., Jr. University of North Carolina Press 2013. ISBN 9781469606927. $39.95 Mexico’s Once…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal Reviews» Prepub Alert

  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • An Inaugural Poet’s Rx for Fear of Poetry; American Poets Prizes

    Barbara Hoffert
    20 Oct 2014 | 10:01 am
    “In America, we don’t have a built-in gene to hate poetry,” proclaimed 2013 inaugural poet Richard Blanco while giving the Blaney Lecture at the eighth annual Poets Forum, an extravaganza of lectures and readings held in New York October 16–18 under the aegis of the Academy of America Poets. But as Blanco pointed out, most Americans are really scared of it—so scared that after the inauguration, some people praised him for his speech, as if the word poem was just too foreign to utter. On the other hand, strangers sometimes approached him with bear hugs, energized by a poem they found…
  • David Baldacci, Larry Kramer, Steven Millhauser, Mary Morris, & More | Barbaras Picks, Apr. 2015, Pt. 3

    Barbara Hoffert
    20 Oct 2014 | 7:58 am
    Baldacci, David. Memory Man. Grand Central. Apr. 2015. 432p. ISBN 9781455559824. $28; ebk. ISBN 9781455586387. lib. ebk. ISBN 9781455559794. CD/downloadable: Hachette Audio. THRILLER Important bulletin to all your thriller fans: mega-best-selling author Baldacci hits a milestone with his 30th adult novel and he launches a new series. His hero is Amos Decker, who has hyperthymesia—no, not a disease, but the ability to remember everything. No more plot details, but expect lots of promo, and look for Baldacci as honorary chair for National Library Week in April 2015. With a 500,000-copy first…
  • Upmarket Fiction from Amit Chaudhuri, Emily Schultz, Adam Thirlwell, & More | Fiction Previews, Apr. 2015, Pt. 3

    Barbara Hoffert
    20 Oct 2014 | 7:53 am
    Begley, Louis. Killer, Come Hither. Nan A. Talese: Doubleday. 256p. ISBN 9780385539142. $25.95; ebk. ISBN 9780385539159. LITERARY/THRILLER In a departure from his smooth-as-melted-butter stories of New York’s stratospheric milieu (e.g., About Schmidt), Begley tries out a literary thriller starring Jack Dana, a Yalie turned marine officer turned successful novelist. Close to his uncle Harry, a big-time law-firm partner (hey, this is a Begley novel), Jack is shocked to learn that Harry has apparently committed suicide by hanging himself and starts investigating. Let’s see where this one…
  • Memoirs from Bergen, Gooch, Julavits, Mulgrew, & More | Nonfiction Previews, Apr. 2015, Pt. 3

    Barbara Hoffert
    20 Oct 2014 | 7:38 am
    Alexander, Elizabeth. The Light of the World: A Memoir. Grand Central. Apr. 2015. 224p. ISBN 9781455599875. $26; ebk. ISBN 9781455599851. lib. ebk. ISBN 9781455579730. Downloadable: Hachette Audio. MEMOIR Expect truth and beauty in this heartrending memoir from poet Alexander, a Pulitzer Prize finalist who recited her “Praise Song for the Day” at President Barack Obama’s 2009 inauguration. Here, after her husband’s sudden death at 49, she reflects on their life together and the process of raising her sons alone. With a 40,000-copy first printing; look for a New Yorker…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal Reviews» Reference

  • What to Keep in Mind When Conducting a Reference Interview

    LJ Reviews
    16 Oct 2014 | 1:20 pm
    by Dave Harmeyer Some of the tips to remember when improving your reference interview skills go back to basics. They begin with studying the approaches that your patrons have to the library. We may assume that patrons want to find information themselves, usually on the Internet. But by the time they make the effort to connect with a librarian they have either exhausted their tolerance for trying to find an accurate, timely answer or they haven’t really started on their journey and hope you can save them time. Remember that Ranganathan was right! One of the expectations a patron has is that…
  • Facts That Astonish, Everything To Know About Zombies, Race and Racism in the United States, & More | Reference Reviews

    LJ Reviews
    7 Oct 2014 | 6:30 am
    Business Encyclopedia of Business and Finance. 3d ed. 2 vols. Gale Cengage. 2014. 900p. ed. by Gale. bibliog. index. ISBN 9780028662640. $485; ebk. ISBN 9780028662688. REF This work intends to cover accounting, marketing, management, and information systems for the nonspecialist. Various entries address business ethics and types of careers in the diverse fields, both of which are useful features. However, a two-volume work with such a broad scope is likely to have errors of omission, and this encyclopedia is no exception. Each entry cross-references related pieces and provides a bibliography…
  • People of the Founding Era; PrivCo | Reference eReviews

    LJ Reviews
    19 Sep 2014 | 6:10 am
    People of the Founding Era: A Prosopographical Approach Rotunda/University of Virginia Press, in collaboration with Documents Compass, a program of the Virginia foundation for the humanities; pfe.rotunda.upress.virginia.edu. To request a free trial, please visit rotunda.upress.virginia.edu/register/default.xqy By Cheryl LaGuardia Content People of the Founding Era: A Prosopographical Approach (PFE) is a digital biographical dictionary funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Its stated goal is “twofold: one is biographical; the other is prosopographical.” For others who, like me, are…
  • Urban Landscapes, Mythic Traditions, Magill’s Medical Guide | Reference Reviews

    LJ Reviews
    19 Sep 2014 | 6:00 am
    Atlas of Cities. Princeton Univ. 2014. 256p. ed. by Paul Knox. illus. maps. bibliog. index. ISBN 9780691157818. $49.50. REF Knox (urban affairs and planning, Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.; Palimpsests: Biographies of 50 City Districts) and 16 other international scholars present an overview of the historical, cultural, demographic, and technological development of selected world metropolises. The principal focus of each topical chapter is a “core” city or cities, with places grouped under umbrella labels: “Foundational” (Athens and Rome); “Networked” (Augsburg,…
  • Humor Studies, American English, plus Short Takes, & More | Reference Reviews

    LJ Reviews
    5 Sep 2014 | 6:00 am
    history Slave Culture: A Documentary Collection of the Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers’ Project. 3 vols. Greenwood. 2014. 1126p. ed. by Spencer Crew & others. illus. bibliog. index. ISBN 9781440800863. $294; ebk. ISBN 9781440800870. REF Presented here are 4,500 narrative excerpts that were selected from interviews conducted between 1936 and 1938 with the last generation of enslaved African Americans. The set opens with an essay on the history of the accounts and a chronology of slavery in the United States. The pieces that follow are organized by seven themes: community…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • How Sacred Are Our Patrons’ Privacy Rights? Answer Carefully | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    My last column addressed some of the tensions that underlie the idea of “not letting the perfect be the enemy of the good” in library leadership, and at the end I promised that my next would deal in a similar way with trying to balance the occasional tension between problems that are truly important and those that are merely “noisy.” However, an issue has come up in the meantime that is more timely and urgent, so I’m putting off the “noisy vs. important” column until next time. This month I want to address the issue of patron privacy in the context of…
  • Penguin Random House Makes Changes at Top | PubCrawl

    Francine Fialkoff
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    In three post–Labor Day memos to Penguin Random House (PRH) staff, CEO Markus Dohle detailed the formation of the Penguin Publishing Group, consolidating all Penguin adult trade publishing (Penguin Adult and Berkley/NAL) under one roof. He named Madeline McIntosh, U.S. president and COO of PRH, to head the new entity and said that longtime Penguin president Susan Petersen Kennedy would be leaving at the end of the year. The change affirmed Dohle’s confidence in McIntosh, who spent most of her career at the Bertelsmann-owned company—starting in 1994 at Bantam Doubleday Dell, with a brief…
  • Seeing More Gray in the College Classroom | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:00 am
    Higher education faces a serious decline in its traditional 18-22 population. Having fewer potential students from the traditional demographic segment could have serious implications for funding. One part of the solution—open the doors to a new demographic segment. When I see a senior citizen in my academic library I imagine he or she is a retiree passing time by reading our newspapers, magazines, or bestsellers. My institution, like many others, does invite senior citizens to audit a limited number of courses, so it’s possible that individual is a program participant. It would never…
  • Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying: Another Big Read Opportunity for Libraries

    Barbara Hoffert
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:16 pm
    The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has expanded its Big Read library with the addition of its first nonfiction selection, Edwidge Danticat’s Brother, I’m Dying, a National Book Critics Circle Award winner and National Book Award finalist published in 2007. In this family memoir, Danticat recounts being raised by her uncle Joseph in Haiti when her father and mother emigrate to America, then traveling Stateside to reunite with parents who are virtual strangers after eight years. Joseph’s flight to America when Danticat is an adult ends in tragedy. MacArthur Fellow Danticat’s…
  • With Funding From Friends Group San Antonio Public Library Installs Digital Book Kiosks at San Antonio International Airport

    Gary Price
    21 Oct 2014 | 11:45 am
    From the San Antonio Business Journal: The San Antonio International Airport has unveiled two Digital Library kiosks that will allow travelers to check out digital media to take on trips. The kiosks were funded by the Friends of the San Antonio Public Library at a cost of $26,000. In addition to allowing travelers to check out online materials, the kiosks will serve as a rapid recharging station for mobile devices. The article includes a photo of a kiosk. But Wait, There’s More The article also mentions that visitors to San Antonio can now get a SAPL card that can be used while visiting…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal Reviews» In the Bookroom

  • Best Books 2014: Romance

    Kristin Ramsdell
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:39 am
    Library Journal‘s Romance reviewer Kristin Ramsdell puts the Top Ten Best Romances of 2014 in perspective. Intelligent, talented, goal-driven heroines are the norm in most romances, and those featured in this year’s best titles are no exception. Whether they are bent on saving a child, foiling a villain, uncovering old secrets, realizing a career, or even saving the hero, these women do it all—and find love in the process, as well. Austin, Lori. The Lone Warrior Signet Eclipse. (Once upon a Time in the West, Bk. 3). ISBN 9780451242327. pap. $7.99; ebk. ISBN 9781101635797. HISTORICAL…
  • Personal Bests | What We’re Reading

    Liz French
    20 Oct 2014 | 2:09 pm
    This week, LJ editors take a break after choosing the best books of 2014, while our colleagues at School Library Journal and LJ carry on with their book club and award-winning reading, and a guest star drops in to tell us what’s happening in Oakland, CA. Barbara Bibel, Oakland P.L., CA LJ reviewer Barbara was in New York recently. She stopped by the LJ/SLJ/JLG offices and told us what she’s reading (she also spied the book Advanced Style by Ari Seth Cohen on our personal bookshelf and recommended a 2012 documentary along the same lines, Pretty Old). After Hank Phillippi Ryan visited…
  • New York Comic Con: Highlights and Surprises

    Stephanie Sendaula
    14 Oct 2014 | 10:15 am
    It has been reported that 151,000 people attended New York Comic Con this past weekend, causing the annual event to beat its unrelated competitor, San Diego Comic-Con, in size. I last attended Comic-Con in 2009, as an ardent supporter of graphic novels. This time I attended for Library Journal, purposely seeking out panels about diversity within the genre and the challenges librarians face when adding comics and graphic novels to their collections. Here are some of the informative sessions I attended: ALA’s Comics—What We’ve Lost, What’s Ahead Attendance: Comfortable Carol…
  • Special Report: Brooklyn Book Festival | What We’re Reading

    Liz French
    14 Oct 2014 | 6:45 am
      Several weeks ago, LJ WWR columnist Liz French (that’s me!) took in the Brooklyn Book Festival, held at Brooklyn Borough Hall and surrounding locales. Here is a very selective listing of what BBF attendees were reading (and writing). After discussing “Storytelling and the Black Experience” with authors Greg Grandin and Marlon James (see below), author Herb Boyd signed copies of By Any Means Necessary: Malcolm X —Real, Not Reinvented (2012, Third World Pr.), which he co-edited. Boyd’s next project is a comprehensive history of Black Detroit, “from 1701 to 2014,” and he is…
  • Darkness and Light | What We’re Reading

    Liz French
    7 Oct 2014 | 12:41 pm
    This week a skeleton crew of School Library Journal/LJ staff confronts trolls, superflu, Hollywood idols, and some dark, dark desires. Mahnaz Dar, Associate Editor, Reviews, SLJ This week, my reading choices are inspired by film and the theater. In anticipation of the movie Gone Girl (based on the book of the same name by Gillian Flynn), I started reading one of the author’s other works, the aptly named Dark Places (Crown), about a woman, who, as a seven-year-old, survives a horrific massacre that rivals the one that took out the Clutter family. Even darker is the sad, empty turn her…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Annoyed Librarian

  • A Library Battle in the Cornhusker State

    Annoyed Librarian
    23 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    There’s a fight brewing in Omaha, Nebraska of all places. I say “of all places” because from a distance Omaha seems like a calm place. Maybe it’s all those Mutual of Omaha commercials I saw as a child. Omaha is reassuring. Nevertheless, the mayor is fighting against the library of all places. I say “of [...]
  • Needs Before Wants, or Vice Versa?

    Annoyed Librarian
    20 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    An American school system decided it needed a new way to screw over poor people, and in Miami-Dade County public libraries are on the frontlines. The article is about students who need online access to complete homework assignments but who don’t have Internet access at home. Naturally, they go to the public library. And that’s [...]
  • A Pension Fight in Phoenix

    Annoyed Librarian
    16 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    A Kind Reader from Phoenix, AZ sent a flyer from an anti-pension group trying to end to pensions for city workers for in Phoenix. The flyer is strange. First, the scare tactic: “Thanks to Phoenix’s current pension system – a Phoenix city librarian was able to retire with a $102,000 a year pension and a [...]
  • Anatomy of a Rock Star Librarian

    Annoyed Librarian
    13 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    This was going to be my acceptance speech upon being inducted into the Librarian Rock Star Hall of Fame, but the more I thought about the rock stars the less fun that seemed. Reading around some library blogs and such I noticed references to librarian rock stars, which supposedly exist. What’s odd about that designation [...]
  • Your Privacy Has Just Been Violated

    Annoyed Librarian
    9 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    The big news in libraryland this week is that libraries using Overdrive are inadvertently handing over large amounts of user data to Adobe because of a security issue with Adobe Digital Editions. Adobe, it seems, “is gathering data on the ebooks that have been opened, which pages were read, and in what order. All of [...]
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    In the Library with the Lead Pipe

  • Using Animated GIF Images for Library Instruction

    Karl Suhr
    22 Oct 2014 | 3:30 am
      In Brief This article discusses the changing nature of animated Graphics Interchange Format images (GIFs) as a form of visual communication on the Web, and how that can be adapted for the purposes of information literacy and library instruction. GIFs can be displayed simultaneously as a sequence of comic book like panels, allowing for a ‘birds eye view’ of all the steps of a process, viewing and reviewing steps as needed without having to rewind or replay an entire video. I discuss tools and practical considerations as well as limitations and constraints. Introduction and…
  • The Right to Read: The How and Why of Supporting Intellectual Freedom for Teens

    Emily Calkins
    8 Oct 2014 | 3:30 am
    Teen girl working in the library (Asheboro Public Library – Flickr) In brief: Intellectual freedom and equal access to information are central to libraries’ mission, but  libraries often fail to consider the intellectual freedom needs of teenage patrons, or lump teen patrons in with children in conversations of intellectual freedom. However, adolescence is developmentally distinct from childhood, and the freedom to access information of all kinds is vital for teen patrons. In this article, I outline the case for protecting intellectual freedom for young adults and provide practical…
  • Locating the Library in Institutional Oppression

    nina de jesus
    24 Sep 2014 | 4:01 am
    Editor’s note: On July 16th, 2014 we published Open Source Outline: Locating the Library within Institutional Oppression, where we discussed nina de jesus’s Outline for a Paper I Probably Won’t Write and called for authors to use her open source outline as the basis for an article of their own. We are pleased that nina herself and Joshua Beatty have both taken up the challenge. Below is nina de jesus’s article based on that outline. In a first for In the Library with the Lead Pipe, we are also simultaneously publishing Joshua Beatty’s article based on the…
  • Locating Information Literacy within Institutional Oppression

    Joshua Beatty
    24 Sep 2014 | 4:00 am
    Editor’s note: On July 16th, 2014 we published Open Source Outline: Locating the Library within Institutional Oppression, where we discussed nina de jesus’s Outline for a Paper I Probably Won’t Write and called for authors to use her open source outline as the basis for an article of their own. We are pleased that nina herself and Joshua Beatty have both taken up the challenge. Below is Joshua Beatty’s article  based on that outline. In a first for In the Library with the Lead Pipe, we are also simultaneously publishing nina de jesus’s article based on the…
  • Open for Business – Why In the Library with the Lead Pipe is Moving to CC-BY Licensing

    Editorial Board
    10 Sep 2014 | 3:30 am
    Blown Away, CC-BY felixtsao (Flickr). In brief: Lead Pipe is changing our licensing from CC-BY-NC to CC-BY. Here, we explain why. In the Library with the Lead Pipe has, since we began publishing in 2008, been run by volunteers with a desire to spread ideas for positive change as widely as possible. For this reason, we have required that all articles are published under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial (CC BY-NC 3.0 US) license. Publishing under a CC BY-NC license has always been viewed by Lead Pipe as a way of balancing our commitment to authors (by ensuring they retain their…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    OEDB.org

  • The Latest in EdTech Trends: 70 Resources Roundup

    Ellyssa Kroski
    22 Oct 2014 | 10:37 am
    Trying to keep up with the latest in EdTech trends? Discover all the latest news happening in EdTech with this roundup post. And if you’re still getting up to speed in this area, also check out the post: 7 Ed Tech Trends to Watch in 2014. MOOCs Universities Rethinking Their Use of Massive Online Courses The Real Revolution in Online Education Isn’t MOOCs Moocs ‘will not transform education’, says FutureLearn chief Disrupting and Transforming the University Weekly Trend: The MOOC Revolution Changes Shape MOOC U: The Revolution Isn’t Over edX turns attention to high school…
  • The 4 Flavors of Makerspaces

    Ellyssa Kroski
    15 Oct 2014 | 4:47 am
    Did you know that there are many different types of makerspaces, each with their own set of unique characteristics? This was news to me until recently so I thought I’d pass along my research on what I found were the important distinctions as well as important links. FabLabs Amsterdam Fab Lab at The Waag Society A FabLab is a type of makerspace that was created by the Center for Bits and Atoms headed by Prof. Dr. Neil Gershenfeld at MIT. It began as an outreach project to provide access to modern means for invention such as electronics equipment, laser cutters, routers and milling…
  • 50 Library Stories You May Have Missed in September

    Ellyssa Kroski
    9 Oct 2014 | 4:23 am
    September was back-to-school and back to writing for many librarians.  Blogs, journals, and news outlets were jam-packed with library and information stories ranging from articles about makerspaces, digital collections, 3D printing, and free technology for libraries as well as some offbeat topics such as medieval selfies and snapchats from Harry Potter!  Check out these 50 posts, infographics, and articles to get you caught up on what’s happening in the LIS world. 15 Geeky Back-to-School Supplies 28 Snapchats From Harry Potter Stay Focused! 5 Tools to Avoid Distractions Polling the…
  • A Quick Guide to the Flipped Classroom

    Ellyssa Kroski
    7 Oct 2014 | 9:44 am
    The flipped classroom is a teaching model in which the traditional lecture and homework assignments are reversed. Students watch video lectures before class and the class session is made up of exercises, discussions, and problem solving with students receiving personalized attention from the professor. This model has grown in popularity over the past several years Definitions Flipped classroom- Wikipedia 7 Things You Should Know About…Flipped Classrooms – Educause What is the Flipped Classroom? – Utexas Center for Teaching and Learning  Flipping the Classroom – Vanderbilt University…
  • 53 Free October Webinars for Librarians

    Ellyssa Kroski
    2 Oct 2014 | 8:41 am
    All the latest free professional development opportunities have been added to our feature page here: Free Live Webinars for Librarians Be sure to bookmark it and check back monthly for updates! The post 53 Free October Webinars for Librarians appeared first on OEDB.org.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Stuff

  • Oakland libraries imperiled by budget cuts

    Steven M. Cohen
    23 Oct 2014 | 11:38 am
    “Next summer Oakland could lose as many as six to eight of its libraries, though it’s too soon to tell which branches might end up on the chopping block. Funded partly by the city’s general fund and partly by Measure Q—a parcel tax issued in 2004 to expand library services and add a sixth day of service at all library branches—the Oakland Public Library could face a $2.5-3.5 million deficit in July 2015, nearly a 10% drop in its total budget. “Cities that have low-funded libraries are generally on the losing end,” Director of Library Services Gerry Garzón said in a recent…
  • Linda Hall Library bets on print over digital

    Steven M. Cohen
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:30 am
    “As a product of the digital age, I’ve been conditioned to believe that anything worth saving is worth saving to an external hard drive. Paper can be ripped, lost, swept away, spilled on or destroyed in any number of ways. For me, digital has always been the way preserve information for the future. Luckily, the folks at Linda Hall Library in Kansas City aren’t quite so naïve.” (via Kansas City Business Journal)
  • So Little Paper to Chase in a Law Firm’s New Library

    Steven M. Cohen
    23 Oct 2014 | 6:57 am
    “The law firm Kaye Scholer left a lot behind when it moved this month from 425 Park Avenue in Manhattan, where it had been since 1957, into new quarters at 250 West 55th Street.It left behind offices that had served giants like Milton Handler, one of whose students, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, called him a “colossus” in the realm of trade regulation; Stanley H. Fuld, a former chief judge of New York State’s highest court; and Abraham A. Ribicoff, who served Connecticut as governor and as a United States senator.It left behind the setting of the greatest drama in its 97-year…
  • Lexis Advance Named Best Online Legal Research Provider by Readers in The Legal Intelligencer

    Steven M. Cohen
    22 Oct 2014 | 11:59 am
    “LexisNexis® Legal & Professional, a leading provider of content and technology solutions, announced today that Lexis Advance®, the company’s dynamic, next-generation legal information service, has been voted the best online legal research provider in The Legal Intelligencer’s “Best of 2014” survey of Pennsylvania legal professionals. This recognition is one of six “Gold” category wins for LexisNexis solutions for the second year in a row.” (via Lexis Nexis)
  • World Series: SF, KC libraries engage in Dewey Decimal Duel

    Steven M. Cohen
    22 Oct 2014 | 7:45 am
    “As it turns out, librarians can bring better trash talk than “Shush!” On the eve of World Series Game 1 between the Giants and Royals, the San Francisco Public Library and its Kansas City counterpart engaged in a war of words on Twitter. And it’s clear the thesaurus got a workout.” (via San Jose Mercury News)
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The 'M' Word - Marketing Libraries

  • Help Kickstart a Movie About US Public Libraries!

    ~Kathy Dempsey
    17 Oct 2014 | 12:02 pm
    Have you heard the news? Some serious filmmakers are working on a movie about public libraries! They have a good start, but now they need our help. They have set up a Kickstarter fund-raising campaign to get money to finish the film. Donations must be in by midnight on Oct. 26.Details from the Urban Library Council, one of the sponsors:Filmmakers Dawn Logsdon and Lucie Faulknor, with Executive Producer Stanley Nelson, are asking library lovers across America to help them make "Free for All: Inside the Public Library," the first major documentary project about our nation’s most beloved and…
  • Pedal Power.... Delivering the Goods.

    Nancy Dowd
    10 Oct 2014 | 5:04 am
    Photo from American Libraries BlogI'm really excited about the bike-based outreach services some libraries have adopted that are extending library services to the streets of their communities.There's a great post in American Libraries, that details the experiences of several libraries. Essentially  passionate librarians and volunteers are using bikes to travel through the community. The bikes are adapted to carry collections and hotspots so people can either check out, download or reserve items on the spot. I love this concept. First off,…
  • Library Communications Conference, Oct. 6 & 7, 2014

    ~Kathy Dempsey
    17 Sep 2014 | 5:02 pm
    In case you haven't heard, there will be a Library Communications Conference in Mount Laurel, New Jersey (USA) on October 6-7, 2014. According to the organizers, "This conference will focus exclusively on the best practices of library communications and outreach, and will feature over 20 relevant workshops and keynote addresses by nationally recognized speakers Kathy Dempsey, Dr. Curtis Rogers, and Angela Montefinise."Here's a PDF of the details & sessions. The event is being organized by the Library Management Institute (LMI), the same group that originally created ALCOP…
  • North Logan Shows the Power of Public Libraries

    ~Kathy Dempsey
    17 Aug 2014 | 11:05 am
    Nancy found this short video that shows what great public libraries can be in their communities...Kudos to the North Logan Library in Cache Valley, Utah on the amazing work it's doing and on the way it's publicizing that to keep growing. If you have a video that you're proud of, give us the link in a comment. Share your great work!The M Word Blog teaches your library and non-profit tips, tricks, and trends of the marketing trade.
  • Can You Express Your Library's Value?

    ~Kathy Dempsey
    21 Jul 2014 | 3:04 pm
    Everywhere I look, I see librarians complaining that people are saying things like, "Why do we still need libraries?" They lament that stakeholders and elected officials don't understand what libraries are really all about.OK, well: How will people know unless we tell them? Every single librarian, Friend, Trustee, and supporter needs to have an answer, an elevator speech, or a comeback, for these questions. What would be even better is if you didn't wait for the question, but rather, proactively told people about the value of libraries in the 21st century. You may think the need for libraries…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Stephen's Lighthouse

  • Atteneo Keynote: Manila Philippines

    Stephen Abram
    23 Oct 2014 | 5:30 pm
    Here are my slides from this morning’s (at least here!) Rizal Library Conference keynote at Atteneo University in Manila, Philippines: Atteneo manilaabram2 from Stephen Abram Stephen
  • Online Harassment

    Stephen Abram
    23 Oct 2014 | 11:03 am
    Online Harassment Source: Pew Research Internet Project “Harassment—from garden-variety name calling to more threatening behavior— is a common part of online life that colors the experiences of many web users. Fully 73% of adult internet users have seen someone be harassed in some way online and 40% have personally experienced it, according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center. Pew Research asked respondents about six different forms of online harassment. Those who witnessed harassment said they had seen at least one of the following occur to others online: 60% of internet…
  • E-Books By The Numbers

    Stephen Abram
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:16 am
    E-Books By The Numbers http://www.statista.com/chart/2862/ebooks-by-the-numbers/ You will find more statistics at Statista Stephen
  • Infographic: Ransomware Threats Raise Concern Among IT Pros

    Stephen Abram
    23 Oct 2014 | 3:51 am
    I’ve certainly experienced this and it took ages to fix my laptop when it was messed up by this. Infographic: Ransomware Threats Raise Concern Among IT Pros The growing threat of ransomware and how it’s affecting organizations today. Stephen
  • The Aspen Institute Releases New Report: “Rising to the Challenge: Re-Envisioning Public Libraries”

    Stephen Abram
    23 Oct 2014 | 3:42 am
    The Aspen Institute Releases New Report: “Rising to the Challenge: Re-Envisioning Public Libraries” Via Gary Price at FullTextReports http://www.infodocket.com/2014/10/14/the-aspen-institute-releases-new-report-rising-to-the-challenge-re-envisioning-public-libraries/ “From a News Release: “Rising to the Challenge: Re-Envisioning Public Libraries” explores how public libraries can respond as the digital age increases the demand for high-speed information access, changes in our education systems, innovative job training models and additional community services to help people and…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Tame The Web

  • Office Hours: Always Doesn’t Live Here Anymore

    Michael
    21 Oct 2014 | 7:18 am
    New column! http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2014/10/opinion/michael-stephens/always-doesnt-live-here-anymore-office-hours/ That said, I must comment on some threads of conversation I had at the American Library Association (ALA) annual conference in Las Vegas. In 2006, I wrote a post at Tame the Web (TTW) entitled “Five Phrases I Hope I Never Hear in Libraries Again.” It got a lot of traction back then, during the heyday of LIS blogging, and I used a slide of the phrases for many years in presentations. One of the phrases was: We’ve always done it this way. Back then I wrote, “I think…
  • Office Hours: In the Moment

    Michael
    20 Oct 2014 | 3:12 pm
    Here’s my June column: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2014/06/opinion/michael-stephens/in-the-moment-office-hours/ More than once, someone in the audience has expressed concern that children and young people are always looking at their mobile device, texting, gaming, or whatever. Recently the comment was this: “I want to take away the iPad and send them outside. They are not in the moment.” My reply was a reminiscence of my mother taking away my Hardy Boys books and sending me out to play one summer day. I was furious! The seminar room vibrated with comments: “It’s the same…
  • Office Hours: Flipping the LIS Classroom

    Michael
    20 Oct 2014 | 3:09 pm
    Oops – forgot to post this: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2014/07/opinion/michael-stephens/flipping-the-lis-classroom-office-hours/ I’m most excited about the requirement for student reflection blogging in this course. Discussion forums, landlocked inside the learning management system, are giving way to a WordPress-enabled blog community that all of our core students will work with for thoughts on the course content. I am a longtime advocate of the power of blogging as a means to foster critical reflection in a safe thinking-out-loud space and promote engagement with other students…
  • Office Hours: Citation Fixation

    Michael
    20 Oct 2014 | 3:07 pm
    Here’s last month’s column – all about getting too hung up on citation formatting: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2014/09/opinion/michael-stephens/citation-fixation-office-hours/ But wait—shouldn’t we be teaching soon-to-be librarians how to cite properly so they in turn can deliver the gospel to their young charges in the university? And grading them down for every missed period or italicized article title? I’d argue that instead of citation fixation we promote reflection and consideration of the ideas presented in our courses. To synthesize is a sometimes overused…
  • #hyperlibMOOC Update

    Michael
    17 Oct 2014 | 1:48 pm
    Together, we’d like to thank everyone who expressed interest in a second iteration of the #hyperlibMOOC.  We believe our MOOC filled an interesting gap in the MOOC phenomenon by providing community-centered, large-scale learning specifically for library and information science professionals.  Our reflections, both scholarly and personal, show that this experience was formative for ourselves as scholars and as a teachers.  But more importantly, we recognize that the #hyperlibMOOC provided a new, engaging way for our students to continue their professional development and lifelong…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Information Wants To Be Free

  • Whistleblowers and what still isn’t transparent

    Meredith Farkas
    26 Sep 2014 | 6:00 am
    Social media is something I have in common with popular library speaker Joe Murphy. We’ve both given talks about the power of social media at loads of conferences. I love the radical transparency that social media enables. It allows for really authentic connection and also really authentic accountability. So many bad products and so much bad behavior have come to light because of social media. Everyone with a cell phone camera can now be an investigative reporter. So much less can be swept under the rug. It’s kind of an amazing thing. But what’s disturbing is what has not…
  • Living essentially

    Meredith Farkas
    11 Sep 2014 | 5:58 am
    “What do I feel deeply inspired by?” and “What am I particularly talented at?” and “What meets a significant need in the world?” Greg McKeownEssentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less So I’m reading this book, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less and it’s not really that great a book (in fact, I nearly shut the book after the first unrealistic “case study”), but it’s gotten me thinking a lot about what I spend my time on. Here’s a description of the book: The Way of the Essentialist isn’t about getting more done in less time.
  • Free and Cheap Technologies to Supercharge Your Teaching

    Meredith Farkas
    3 Sep 2014 | 10:02 am
    Just gave a fun whirlwind instructional technology talk and I wanted to provide the slides and links below for the attendees (and anyone else who’s interested). Slides: Links: Tools for Point of Need and/or Mobile Instruction Library DIY ARIS QR Codes QR Codes Video Demo QR Code Generators Kaywa QR Stuff QR Code Readers Kaywa Quickmark Beetagg QR Code Treasure Hunt Generator Where in the Library is Carmen Sandiego? Gamification and Badges HML-IQ Passport scvngr NCSU Libraries Mobile Scavenger Hunt Tools for Synchronous Online Instruction Google Hangouts Skype ooVoo join.me Tools for…
  • Reflections on library assessment and the Library Assessment Conference

    Meredith Farkas
    22 Aug 2014 | 11:22 am
    I wanted to write about the Library Assessment Conference as soon as I returned, but unfortunately, life got in the way. I got barely a week and a half before I was set to leave my job and, not surprisingly, there was a lot of wrapping up of projects and getting things to a good place to hand them over to colleagues. My last day was August 15th and after spending six days riding bikes in Sunriver, Oregon, I finally have some time to take a breath and reflect. I went to the Library Assessment Conference two years ago, and for some reason, spent most of the time feeling like I should be…
  • On tenure, after three years on the tenure track

    Meredith Farkas
    23 Jul 2014 | 6:15 am
    Way back in 2005, I wrote a post about tenure for librarians in which I argued against it. Since then, I’ve spent six years as a librarian with faculty rank and no tenure and three years as a librarian on the tenure track, and I can say that my feelings against tenure status for librarians has only grown stronger. When I told one of my colleagues that I was leaving for Portland Community College, she said “are you sad you’re not going to be doing scholarship anymore?” Why wouldn’t I? Portland Community College already has 3 Library Journal Movers and Shakers…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Unquiet Librarian

  • Pre-Search and Mindmapping to Narrow a Topic Focus

    The Unquiet Librarian
    23 Oct 2014 | 10:34 am
    In my last post, I shared how we were moving deeper with our second round of more targeted pre-search after students had narrowed topic choices to one from their work with the first phase of pre-search.  To help our students begin to make sense of the information they had collected during their second round of pre-search, Sarah and I introduced mindmapping to our two classes.   There were a couple of factors that influenced this decision: I had previously used mindmapping with great success at my last school. Thanks to my friend and colleague Kristin Fontichiaro, I was inspired by a post…
  • Written Conversation Strategies PD with Our NHS Faculty

    The Unquiet Librarian
    22 Oct 2014 | 9:23 am
    My fellow librarian Jennifer Lund and I were delighted yesterday to have the opportunity to do an hour PD session on Harvey Daniels’ written conversation strategies with our NHS Faculty.  Roughly 25 teachers, our principal, and one of our assistant principals attended the session; the mix of different departments, including Modern Languages, Science, Math, Language Arts, ESOL, Special Education, Social Studies, and Health and Physical Education, created a wonderful energy as all of our participants were truly engaged and enthusiastic!   This session was just one of many tasty…
  • Simple Yet Powerful Formative Assessment of IR with Sarah Rust

    The Unquiet Librarian
    22 Oct 2014 | 8:23 am
    Every Wednesday is Independent Reading (IR) day here in our Language Arts classes here at NHS.  Today, Language Arts teacher Sarah Rust, one of our awesome collaborative partners, did this very simple yet interesting formative assessment with her students.   The instructions: Students selected a sticky note of a color of their choosing and then composed their responses.  As an extra touch to celebrate the concept of IR, Ms. Rust then took their responses and fashioned them into the letters “IR.”   While this idea seems simple on the surface, the student responses were…
  • Pre-Searching Round Two: Moving Toward a More Specific Topic for Research and Inquiry

    The Unquiet Librarian
    14 Oct 2014 | 10:14 am
    After introducing students to some basics of information evaluation, we began our second phase of pre-searching on Monday, October 6.   Our learning targets included (based on our district content area standards and the AASL Standards for the 21st Century Learner): I can use prior background knowledge as context for new learning. I can find, evaluate, and select appropriate sources to answer questions. I can read widely and fluently to make connections with self, the world, and previous reading. I can use my library time wisely to think deeply on my work and stay on task. We began the…
  • Collaborative Information Source Evaluation: Research/Inquiry Circles and the CRAAP Test

    The Unquiet Librarian
    10 Oct 2014 | 9:17 am
    Last week, students completed the gentle entry-level phase of pre-search (see the end of this post for more detailed reflections); teacher Sarah Rust and I felt it would be helpful to introduce information and source evaluation skills to our students before moving forward into the next round of pre-searching.    We grouped students into collaborative “research” or “inquiry” circles based on their initial topic interests.  We plan to use these research circles as a medium for workshopping with small groups as we move deeper into research and inquiry; these groups…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    What I Learned Today...

  • ATO2014: Lessons from Open Source Schoolhouse

    Nicole C. Engard
    23 Oct 2014 | 1:56 pm
    Charlie Reisinger from the Penn Manor School District talked to us next about open source at his school. This was an expanded version of his lightning talk from the other night. Penn Manor has 9 IT team members – which is a very lean staff for 4500 devices. They also do a lot of their technology in house. Before we talk about open source we took a tangent in to the nature of education today. School districts are so stuck on the model they’re using and have used for centuries. But today kids can learn anything they would like with a simple connection to the Internet. You can be…
  • Bookmarks for October 23, 2014

    Nicole C. Engard
    23 Oct 2014 | 1:30 pm
    Today I found the following resources and bookmarked them on <a href= Nest Material Design Icons Material Design Icons are the official open-source icons featured in the Google Material Design specification. SmartThings Control and monitor your home from one simple app Digest powered by RSS Digest The post Bookmarks for October 23, 2014 appeared first on What I Learned Today.... Related posts: Open Access Day in October Create Android Apps Launchy for Windows – Like Finder for Mac
  • ATO2014: Open sourcing the public library

    Nicole C. Engard
    23 Oct 2014 | 12:55 pm
    Phil Shapiro one of my fellow opensource.com moderators talked to us next about open source and libraries. Too many people ask what is the future of libraries and not what “should the future be”. A book that we must read is “Expect More: Demanding Better Libraries For Today’s Complex World“. If we don’t expect more of libraries we’re not going to see libraries change. We have to change the frame of mind that libraries belong the directors – they actually belong to the people and they should be serving the people. Phil asks how we get some community…
  • ATO2014: How ‘Open’ Changes Products

    Nicole C. Engard
    23 Oct 2014 | 11:44 am
    Next up at All Things Open was Karen Borchert talking about How ‘Open’ Changes Products. We started by talking about the open product conundrum. There is a thing that happens when we think about creating products in an open world. In order to understand this we must first understand what a product is. A product is a good, idea, method, information or service that we want to distribute. In open source we think differently about this. We think more about tools and toolkits instead of packages products because these things are more conducive to contribution and extension. With…
  • ATO2014: Women in Open Source Panel

    Nicole C. Engard
    23 Oct 2014 | 10:04 am
    Over lunch today we had a panel of 6 women in open source talk to us. The first question was about their earlier days – what made them interested in open source or computer science or all of it. Intros Megan started in humanities and then just stumbled in to computer programming. Once she got in to it she really enjoyed it though. Elizabeth got involved with Linux through a boyfriend early on. She really fell in love with Linux because she was able to do anything she wanted with it. She joined the local Linux users group and they were really supportive and never really made a big deal…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    LJ INFOdocket

  • Health Care: New Search Tool For Open Payments Database Now Available

    Gary Price
    23 Oct 2014 | 5:59 pm
    Note: Update to a Post from October 3rd. From the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Blog: Open Payments is a congressionally mandated, national disclosure program that promotes transparency and accountability in health care. But what does “transparency” mean to you as a patient, and why is it important? The program gives you the opportunity to know if your doctors have a financial relationship with companies that make or supply medications, medical supplies or devices, and the biological products used in your care. The bottom line is that knowing about these relationships…
  • Update to Adobe Digital Editions Now Online (Version 4.01) & Privacy Policy Updated

    Gary Price
    23 Oct 2014 | 3:31 pm
    Here’s a formal statement from Adobe announcing an update to Digital Editions. Now, today’s statement from Adobe. The Digital Editions 4 software update (Digital Editions 4.0.1), which addresses the collection and transmission of certain usage data in clear text,* is now available. With this latest version of Digital Editions 4, the data is sent to Adobe via secure transmission (using HTTPS). Adobe Digital Editions 4 users are receiving an update notification via the auto-update mechanism built into the product. The latest version of the product can also be downloaded from the…
  • Academic and Research Libraries: Slides From “Hot Topics” Session at 2014 IFLA World Library and Info Congress Now Online

    Gary Price
    23 Oct 2014 | 3:00 pm
    The IFLA World Library and Information Congress 2014 was held in Lyon, France during August. Today, IFLA’s Academic and Research Libraries Section announced that slides from the “Hot Topics” are now available online. Radical collaboration – libraries working together in new ways by James G Neal, Columbia University Open access monographs by Dr Hildegard Schaffler, Bavarian State Library Change management – is it working? by Louise Jones, Chinese University of Hong Kong Ryerson one stop course readings service - partnerships in action by Madeleine Lefebvre,…
  • Chronicling America Database of Historic American Newspapers Adds More than 50 New Topic Pages

    Gary Price
    23 Oct 2014 | 2:35 pm
    The Chronicling America database from the Library of Congress currently provides access to more that 8.1 million digitized pages of historic newspapers published in the U.S. between 1836-1922. From an Announcement Posted Today by LC (via Email and RSS): In recent months, more than 50 new topic pages describing contemporary press coverage of historic events, people, and culture have been added to Chronicling America by the LC Newspaper and Current Periodicals reference staff. (Topic pages provide useful information for searching specific subjects in Chronicling America’s historic…
  • Industry News Headline Roundup

    Gary Price
    23 Oct 2014 | 9:20 am
    1. Singapore’s National Library Board Joins the Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) BHL now includes 16 member and 5 affiliate institutions and at last count provides free online access to 88,071 titles/152,090 volumes/44,879,175 pages. 2. Web of Science Adds KCI Korean Journal Database “The KCI Korean Journal Database provides a comprehensive snapshot of the most influential regional content from researchers in South Korea. Using citation connections from the Web of Science™, regional work is framed within the broader context of global research.” 3. EPUB News Roundup From…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    ALM RSS Feeds

  • Latest Library Links, October 23, 2014

    geberhart
    23 Oct 2014 | 2:06 pm
    ALA News Ohio Library Council hosts congressional roundtable discussion Association membership for fun and professional profit Division News LITA Forum: Online registration ends October 27
  • Latest Library Links, October 22, 2014

    geberhart
    22 Oct 2014 | 2:15 pm
    ALA News Arthur Curley Memorial Lecture at Midwinter The largest US public libraries: Top 25 rankings Division News Contribute content to the YALSA Wiki on October 29
  • AL Direct, October 21, 2014

    geberhart
    21 Oct 2014 | 2:30 pm
  • Latest Library Links, October 21, 2014

    geberhart
    21 Oct 2014 | 2:05 pm
    ALA News ALA responds to recent Georgia State fair use ruling ERT/Booklist Author Forum at Midwinter
  • Building Value with Curriculum Alignment

    KBANE
    21 Oct 2014 | 10:31 am
    Every year I set myself the task of writing an article on a key question of strategic importance to libraries. It’s a worthwhile challenge. It forces me to think deeply about a single topic, consume the related literature and research, interview customers, and try to say something useful.
 
Log in