Libraries

  • Most Topular Stories

  • I Love Being a Librarian

    Informania
    Fran Bullington
    25 Aug 2012 | 7:30 am
    As the summer was coming to a close, I had a thought that I never imagined would enter my head:  maybe retirement wouldn’t be so bad. Who I Am at the Core I am now in my 36th year of education.  Education has been, and continues to be, part of my core.  I am a nerd from the tip of my auburn head (not so much my natural color now)  to the hot pink polished nails at the end of my toes.  As a classroom teacher for 29 years, I loved interacting with teens and our discussions about literature. I loved reading their writing (well, maybe the research papers tested my soul) and discovering…
  • Spring & Summer Speaking schedule

    Pattern Recognition
    griffey
    17 Apr 2015 | 6:47 am
    Spring and Summer are bringing another round of speaking appearances, all of which I am very excited to be doing. I’m heading to some great conferences and am really excited to meet awesome librarians across the country.  If you are going to be attending any of the following, please say hello! April 20-22 – New Jersey Library Association Conference, Wednesday morning Keynote April 26-29 – Computers in Libraries 2015,  Cybertour on Measure the Future on Monday at 1pm and the Decades of Innovation panel on Tuesday evening (OMG I get to be on a panel with Jan and Meg and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    Library Journal
    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • A week of technology instruction

    librarian.net
    jessamyn
    16 Mar 2015 | 3:54 pm
    So since I left MetaFilter almost a year ago, my goal was to spend more time “librarianing” I have a part time job with the Internet Archive running Open Library. I write for The Message a Medium publication, sometimes about librarianship and sometimes not. I write monthly for Computers in Libraries. I do my local technology instruction through the Adult Education program at the local vocational high school. In the past I’ve also done a lot of “How I do it” talks on the road at library conferences. I have not been doing that this month. Instead, I’ve been…
  • Banned Posters Week

    Annoyed Librarian
    Annoyed Librarian
    16 Apr 2015 | 3:00 am
    There’s controversy brewing in the library community because a lot of librarians like to find stuff to get upset about to distract themselves from how boring their jobs are. The latest controversy is over a Banned Books Week poster. Yes, it’s a poster you can buy, and people are upset about it because they don’t […]
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    David Lee King

  • #checkitout, Taylor Swift, & National Library Week

    David Lee King
    13 Apr 2015 | 7:04 am
    Guess what? It’s National Library Week! To celebrate, some really creative staff and customers at my library have made a fun, creative, and AWESOME parody video of Taylor Swift’s song Shake It Off. Yes, ours is called Check It Out. Please watch the video (pretty sure you guys will like it). We have a goal: we want to encourage library advocacy, and get people to check out the library! We also want this video shared as widely as possible. So, I have a request or two: Please share the video in your favorite social media channels – the Youtube Video link is here. Use these…
  • New Music from Me

    David Lee King
    9 Apr 2015 | 6:30 am
    Sort of a break from my normal posts. If you’ve liked any of the music I’ve created over the years, well … this blog post is for you! I’ve been working on a new album full of songs – 11 in all. And here they are! This video features my song I Drive a Pacer. It’s about fixing up and cruising around in an old AMC Pacer. Purposefully silly! Like this song? There are 10 more just like it! You’ll find songs about robots, getting older, regrets, God, headaches, and erasers. Mostly in a rock/alternative style. You can find it on iTunes and at Bandcamp.
  • Instagram at the Library

    David Lee King
    31 Mar 2015 | 6:30 am
    Awhile back, I mentioned that my library has an Instagram account, and talked about managing multiple Instagram accounts. Here’s what we’re actually doing with our Instagram account. I’d love to hear your library’s plans and goal for your own Instagram accounts – so please share them! For starters, we’re using Instagram because people in Topeka are using Instagram. An easy way to discover this is to notice what local businesses are doing. For example, if you enter a local restaurant, or get a flyer in the mail advertising a local business, Instagram will probably be one of…
  • More Info about iBeacon Technology

    David Lee King
    24 Mar 2015 | 6:30 pm
    My last couple of articles have looked into iBeacon technology. Interested in finding out more? This article has a bunch of links for more reading on iBeacons, and what’s happening with them. Enjoy! My articles on iBeacons: iBeacon Technology Non-Retail Uses for iBeacons iBeacons and the Library More Info about iBeacon Technology (that’s this article!) Library-related iBeacon articles: The Internet of Things Plan to Make Libraries and Museums Awesomer Libraries Get Cutting Edge Tech with iBeacons “Beacon” Technology Deployed by Two Library App Makers Even More iBeacon…
  • iBeacons and the Library

    David Lee King
    19 Mar 2015 | 6:30 am
    I’ve shown what iBeacons are, and what they do in non-retail settings. Can they be used in a library setting? Definitely – because some libraries are already experimenting with them! There are currently two companies in the library industry working with iBeacons (that I know of, anyway): Bluubeam Capira Technologies What are these companies focusing on? Bluubeam sends out location-based messaging. For example, if you walk into the teens area of the library (and have the Bluubeam app on your mobile device), you might get a message about what’s happening in the teen section…
 
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    librarian.net

  • asking for what you want, getting what you want

    jessamyn
    15 Apr 2015 | 7:22 pm
    This has been a heady National Library Week for many librarians I know and me in particular. There’s been a lot of online agita and, unlike the way these things usually go, some things wound up changing for the better. Here’s a list. Apologies if I link too much to facebooky stuff. Someone mentioned that they found Demco’s “Spanish” spine label a bit troublesome since it had a sombrero and a set of maracas (Mexican, not Spanish, and still stereotypical at that) and misspelled español (without the tilde). A few people complained to Demco. Demco listened, agreed,…
  • Why SpaceX photos aren’t public domain (yet)

    jessamyn
    21 Mar 2015 | 2:01 pm
    Sometimes people who license their digital content aren’t really thinking it through. They may have something else on their minds or copyright nuance may not be their thing. I think it behooves us copyright advocates and activists to (at least) politely try to push the envelope towards more open content licensing. Here’s the example I enjoyed from today. This is interesting especially because Flickr uses Creative Commons licensing, but does not use CC-0 which is an intentional choice. Photos from cultural heritage organizations which are in the Flickr Commons have an additional…
  • A week of technology instruction

    jessamyn
    16 Mar 2015 | 3:54 pm
    So since I left MetaFilter almost a year ago, my goal was to spend more time “librarianing” I have a part time job with the Internet Archive running Open Library. I write for The Message a Medium publication, sometimes about librarianship and sometimes not. I write monthly for Computers in Libraries. I do my local technology instruction through the Adult Education program at the local vocational high school. In the past I’ve also done a lot of “How I do it” talks on the road at library conferences. I have not been doing that this month. Instead, I’ve been…
  • quick parent safety lectures

    jessamyn
    5 Mar 2015 | 5:38 am
    The principals of all the local schools got together and did a parent safety evening at the school. I was one of the presenters. I think they were expecting a big turnout, but it was a small (but interested) crowd. I did two very short presentations 1. Ten apps in ten minutes. For parents who are not using mobile devices for social purposes outside of facebook, knowing what the various apps are and what they do can be useful. I just had a very basic slide deck and talked over some images of the apps. I had to learn to use Snapchat which was sort of hilarious. 2. “How the heck does this…
  • How to hold a blood drive in the spirit of intellectual freedom

    jessamyn
    3 Feb 2015 | 7:18 pm
    It’s been fun being able to follow along with the ALA Midwinter conference on a bunch of different social media fronts. I was just reading the Stonewall Book Awards press release (congrats everyone) and noticed the GLBT Round Table page where I read the press release about the blood drive that happened during ALA. And it made me happy. Both because there was a blood drive but also because there was the recognition of the discriminatory nature of the decisions regarding the eligible donor pool–nearly all gay and bisexual men can’t donate blood at all–and they not only…
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    Agnostic, Maybe

  • Community, Inclusiveness, and Offensive Materials

    Andy
    12 Apr 2015 | 3:28 pm
    When you look at this image, what do you see? This is the (current) official graphic for 2015 Banned Books Week. If the ALA Think Tank thread is any indication, there are many ways to interpret this image. The image is the unlikely love child between a book and Do Not Enter sign, punctuated with an unwieldy portmanteau that took me a couple attempts for my eyes to read through (or understandification). Some see a reference to a niqab, some find it personally offensive, some find it offensive on the behalf of others, and still others, well, don’t come to any of these conclusions. And I’m…
  • Fatherhood, Libraryland, and Other Incomplete Thoughts

    Andy
    2 Apr 2015 | 12:28 pm
    I managed to make it through the whole month of March without noting that it was the six year anniversary of this blog. Well, without publically noting, like I am doing right now. It’s a bit of a wild ride down memory lane to look at those blog posts in hindsight; the different styles of blogging that I was trying, the speed and sheer volume of blog posts I posted at the time, and the development of many professional and personal issues in those short years. When I started writing here, I had only been a employed librarian for eighteen months, married to my first wife, and living in my…
  • Reconsidering the Think Tank

    Andy
    17 Feb 2015 | 7:38 pm
    (Note: This post was originally written when the group had been changed to Closed, meaning it could be not viewed except by members. That has been reversed as of the moment of publication, but I still wanted to post this as is. –A) With a click of a button, the ALA Think Tank is gone. Well, gone is a relative term here since it still exists but as a closed Facebook group. The days of drama voyeurism are not necessarily gone, but now you have to join the group in order to see what the fuss is about. I’m sure it won’t be a loss to the lives of many librarians (provided they have even…
  • Two Thumbs Down

    Andy
    9 Feb 2015 | 8:28 pm
    Over the weekend, this image found its way into my social media streams: Because no minor librarian outrage can go unchecked, this image appeared on the ALA Think Tank: My gut reaction has been mostly focused on the word “stupid” with a variety of adjectives dancing around, but after a few hours of consideration I think it’s worse than that. Just as two wrongs do not make a right, two stupids do not make a smart. From what I know, the top image is hanging in a high school library, which we all know is a natural destination for adult erotic books. The perceived slam against public…
  • Disruption

    Andy
    1 Feb 2015 | 7:45 pm
    I’ve had a hard time bringing fingers to the keyboard in any sort of blog entry lately. It’s not that I haven’t had any thoughts or things I’ve wanted to write about, but I feel like I’m stuck in a manner of speaking. Since I don’t get it out and onto the screen, they just start to pile up like the old McDonald styrofoam food packaging: discarded but not going to degrade on any short time scale. On one hand, my thoughts towards libraryland feel like they are building a callus of cynicism. It’s hard to get terribly excited about anything, even the pet issues that I’ve come…
 
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    Swiss Army Librarian

  • Readbox – Red and White and Fun All Over

    Brian Herzog
    15 Apr 2015 | 5:30 am
    A friend of mine sent me a link to this: Pretty neat, and not too difficult a display to make. Good job, whichever library this is. Thanks Chris.
  • Reference Question of the Week – 4/5/15

    Brian Herzog
    10 Apr 2015 | 10:35 pm
    Alright, this question can be filed under, how maybe not to run a scavenger hunt. Last Saturday I came in to work for a few hours in the morning to cover for someone*. Before we opened to the public I was updating some of the computers, and was still sitting at a public workstation when, a few minutes after opening, two of my coworkers walked up on either side of me. They asked, Coworker 1: Brian where are the tickets? Everyone's asking for the tickets. Where are they? Me: [minding my own business] Coworker 2: Brian the Police hid tickets in the library. We don't know where they are - do you?
  • Overdrive App Adds Option for Dyslexic Font

    Brian Herzog
    9 Apr 2015 | 7:14 am
    A coworker send me this post from the Overdrive blog: Standard font typefaces are often difficult to read for people with dyslexia as the letters are hard to differentiate and words tend to jumble together. Dyslexic fonts provide greater contrast in letters which solves this problem. This new font option will make reading easier for students with dyslexia as well as library patrons who struggle with the condition. Determining letters is now much easier, allowing readers to concentrate on the book’s content instead. This seems like a great enhancement. It also seems like one of things where…
  • Reference Question of the Week – 3/29/15

    Brian Herzog
    4 Apr 2015 | 6:30 am
    This was an extremely timely question - and one I even personally benefited from. A patron came to the desk and asked if he could find out if the IRS had mailed him his tax refund check yet. This year has been notorious for longer-than-usual waits for everything from the IRS, but he said he'd mailed in his paper tax returns over a month ago and in past years the IRS has had pretty quick turnaround on refunds. Coincidentally, I also do my taxes with paper forms, and mailed them in just about a month ago, and likewise have not received my refund check yet. So this patron made me realize I had…
  • Introducing Intergenerational Library Shelving

    Brian Herzog
    1 Apr 2015 | 5:39 am
    My library has implemented a few alternatives to Dewey shelving in the past, but we're rolling out something this week that I'm really excited about - we're calling it Intergenerational Shelving. The idea originated when we noticed the difficulties some families had in using the library. Parents would bring their kids in, often of various ages, and picking up books for everyone required stopping in multiple departments. Wouldn't it be nice, we reasoned, if we didn't cordon people off by age, but instead opened up the entire library for everyone? Yes! So our solution was to intermix all of the…
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    ACRLog

  • (Un)Written Tips for New LIS Students (Or, What I Learned In Grad School)

    Sarah Crissinger
    16 Apr 2015 | 6:00 am
    It’s mid-April and so many things are wrapping up. Most of my class projects have been turned in. I’m calculating the last hours I owe at each graduate assistantship. I just landed my first professional position! And—maybe most excitingly—one of my largest projects, the 2015 Symposium on LIS Education just happened last weekend. I’m finding myself with more free time (thank you, Lord) but also more anxiety about the future of my career. Why not take a minute to look in the rear view mirror and reflect on the past instead of getting caught up on the “what ifs” of the future?
  • Focus and Spring Fevers

    Erin Miller
    10 Apr 2015 | 5:51 pm
    It always seems so unfair that people tend to get sick in the springtime. Just as the weeks of perfect temperatures and sunshine get underway and you want to be outside all the time just soaking in the gorgeous weather along come allergies, and sinus infections, colds and flu, etc. This year I was lucky enough to get sick twice in rapid succession so for the last week or so I have had a hard time focusing on anything more complicated than what time of day to take my next dose of decongestant and how many packages of tissues I need for any given event. And of course remembering to never forget…
  • Facilitating student learning and engagement with formative assessment

    Jennifer Jarson
    9 Apr 2015 | 7:14 am
    Information literacy instruction is a big part of my job. For a little context, I teach somewhere in the range of 35-45 classes per semester at my small liberal arts college. While a few of the sessions might sometimes be repeats for a course with multiple sections, they’re mostly unique classes running 75 minutes each. I’ve been teaching for some time now and while I’m a better teacher than I was ten or five years ago or even last year, there’s always plenty of room for improvement of course. A few months ago, I wrote a post about reflection on and in my teaching, about integrating…
  • Open Education Week 2015: A Reflection on IP, Infrastructure, and Interest

    Sarah Crissinger
    23 Mar 2015 | 6:00 am
    This year, Open Education Week ran from March 9th to March 13th. Open Education Week, like Open Access Week, is a celebration of what has been accomplished and what is currently being done within the greater open movement. The Open Education Consortium sponsors the week by compiling resources, marketing materials, and educational tools for librarians, faculty, and other instructors around the world. One of the best parts about this process is that after the week ends, the Open Education website becomes a repository of sorts for events that happened that year. The resources for each event…
  • The Key Word is Scalability

    Lindsay O'Neill
    20 Mar 2015 | 5:00 am
    Cal State Fullerton is a campus of 38,000 students and 2,000 faculty. We have about sixteen instruction librarians (figuring in part-time people). That’s 2,375 students and 125 faculty for each librarian. From these numbers, you won’t be surprised when I tell you that we are very interested in exploring scalable solutions to reach more of our campus. Of course, our staff isn’t going to be scaled up anytime soon. Minimized over the last few years through attrition, instruction librarian staff here is already struggling to keep up with existing obligations. We also have a fixed number of…
 
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    The Distant Librarian

  • Identifying and avoiding predatory publishers: a primer for researchers

    Paul R. Pival
    14 Apr 2015 | 7:47 pm
    My colleague Rob sent a link out about this new 2-page brief from the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL): Identifying and avoiding predatory publishers: a primer for researchers (pdf). So-called predatory publishers are those that lack discernible scholarship, academic rigour or credibility. They use aggressive practices to recruit authors and editors. Predatory publishers’ opaque operations and editorial processes are suggestive of an intention to deceive both authors and readers (Butler, 2013). One of the links in the document points out that Jeffrey Beall maintains a…
  • What is a (public) library?

    Paul R. Pival
    19 Feb 2015 | 10:57 am
    We have lots of conversations in my extended family about the role of the public library these days, and I happened across an interesting post from an unlikely source - the Kickstarter blog. In a post titled, Libraries are Everywhere, the author asks the following questions of four founders or employees of very non-traditional, yet public, libraries: What is a library? How would you define it? What's so important about libraries? What do all good libraries have in common? The year is 2050. What are libraries like in the future? What advice do you have for people that want to create a…
  • Mellen's lawsuit against Dale Askey has been dropped!

    Paul R. Pival
    6 Feb 2015 | 8:24 am
    As reported by Dale on Twitter, and fleshed out a bit by The Chronicle of Higher Education, the SLAPP lawsuit by Edwin Mellen Press against Dale Askey has been dropped! Awesome news!  number of lawsuits in my life: 0. yes, friends, it's over. details to follow, someday, but for now, just a big thanks to all who helped. — Dale Askey (@daskey) February 4, 2015
  • 18 Best Open Source Tools for 2014

    Paul R. Pival
    23 Dec 2014 | 8:18 am
    I happened across this list of the 18 Best Open Source Tools for 2014, and thought you might find something of use in there. Of particular interest for this audience, take a peek at ShareX, "an open source program that lets you take screenshots or screencasts of any selected area with a single key, save them in your clipboard, hard disk or instantly upload them to over 30 different file hosting services. In addition to taking screenshots, it can upload images, text files and all other different file types." Hint: click on the images in each post to go to the site in question.
  • 2014 (and 2013) - My year in reading

    Paul R. Pival
    19 Dec 2014 | 11:47 am
    Way back in 2011 I thought it'd be fun to note the books I had read the previous year. I kept the info in a text file and created a couple of infographics to go along with the post. I did the same in 2012, but never got around to 2013. I have been logging all my reads in Goodreads though, so it's time for a quick update. I wish they provided some graphics to go along with, but c'est la vie. Books read in 2014 (37)Books read in 2013 (21) I do almost all of my reading on my Kindle Paperwhite now, with most books coming from Overdrive at Calgary Public Library, loaded through…
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    Pattern Recognition

  • Spring & Summer Speaking schedule

    griffey
    17 Apr 2015 | 6:47 am
    Spring and Summer are bringing another round of speaking appearances, all of which I am very excited to be doing. I’m heading to some great conferences and am really excited to meet awesome librarians across the country.  If you are going to be attending any of the following, please say hello! April 20-22 – New Jersey Library Association Conference, Wednesday morning Keynote April 26-29 – Computers in Libraries 2015,  Cybertour on Measure the Future on Monday at 1pm and the Decades of Innovation panel on Tuesday evening (OMG I get to be on a panel with Jan and Meg and…
  • Measure the Future and Privacy

    griffey
    1 Apr 2015 | 6:51 am
    If you are curious about the Measure the Future project (using simple and inexpensive sensors that can collect data about building usage to make strategic decisions that create more efficient and effective experiences for patrons) and how that might overlap with library patron privacy concerns, I posted a lengthy outline of the ideas and concepts on that front over on the Measure the Future blog. An excerpt: The thing that I’ve gotten the most comments and emails about is the degree to which Measure the Future is “creepy.” There is both and implicit and explicit expectation of privacy…
  • Carbon3D Printer Analysis

    griffey
    17 Mar 2015 | 6:41 pm
    This morning, a new 3D printing company (Carbon3D) won the marketing lottery, by appearing in a story in the Washington Post, and then being featured pretty much everywhere possible online. They were tweeted hundreds of times. While I trust that they really are doing something different, the overall technology isn’t new…it is a variation on stereolithography,  which predates fused deposition modeling (what most library 3d printers are using) as a technology. It’s not even the first consumer level stereolithographic printer! The Form 1…
  • LibraryBox at Computers in Libraries 2015

    griffey
    16 Mar 2015 | 6:26 am
    Way back in March of 2012, I debuted the very first proof-of-concept for the LibraryBox Project at Computers in Libraries in Washington DC. It was the first time a LibraryBox was tested in public, and the reactions and feedback were integral to moving the project forward to where it is today. The first one was actually embedded in a real book (I liked the irony of the presentation). Where it is today is amazing! We are polishing the v2.1 release of the open source code that lets anyone in the world build their own offline digital file sharing device, which includes a really improved…
  • Apple Watch Predictions

    griffey
    8 Mar 2015 | 2:45 pm
    Tomorrow is March 9th, and that means that we will get the formal Apple announcement of the Apple Watch. As always, I’ll be live tweeting the announcement, but I wanted to make a couple of predictions here about pricing, mostly because I think they are going to surprise everyone. All that Apple has said thus far about pricing is the quote from the initial announcement of the product that “Apple Watch will start at $350″. There are three tiers of the watch, each made of different materials: Apple Watch Sport, which is aluminum and glass; Apple Watch, which is stainless steel…
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    ResearchBuzz

  • IBM, Duke U., RSS, More: Friday Afternoon Buzz, April 16, 2015

    ResearchBuzz
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:25 am
    NEW RESOURCES IBM is putting its security threat database into the cloud. “The project, which started about a year ago, will see Big Blue’s 700 terabyte archive of security data go online in an archive dubbed the ‘IBM X-Force Exchange’. This includes malware threat intelligence from 270 million end users, threat information on 25 billion websites, and images and details of more than a million IP addresses linked to hacking. In addition, the firm is including a library of APIs and software tools to allow third parties to either use the data to harden up their own…
  • Landsat, Colorado, WordPress, More: Fat Friday Morning Buzz, April 17, 2015

    ResearchBuzz
    17 Apr 2015 | 3:17 am
    I devoted some time to ResearchBuzz last night because it’s either that or go round the twist. Prepare for a deluge. NEW RESOURCES Phil Bradley has a quick writeup about a search engine called Instya. It’s a metasearch engine. Citizens of Colorado have a new tool to see how their tax dollars are spent. “The online tool, called the Taxpayer Receipt tool, generates a breakdown of where individuals’ tax dollars go based on their age, annual income and how much they drive. It’s part of an interactive website called Balancing Act, launched last week in Colorado to…
  • Hell Week: Posting Will Be Minimal

    ResearchBuzz
    13 Apr 2015 | 6:18 pm
    I am going through one of my periodic hell weeks at work and posting will be minimal at best. I’ll be back with bells on Sunday. I hope. I still love you.
  • UFOs, Apple, Economists, More – Saturday Evening Buzz, April 11, 2015

    ResearchBuzz
    11 Apr 2015 | 5:42 pm
    NEW RESOURCES Every UFO sighting since 1933 has been put on a map. “The intergalactic graphic was created by MBA candidate Christian Pearson using web-based software and data from the National UFO reporting center. It’s a part of QuantBait, a visualization initiative through which Pearson wants to tell stories about economic, political, and social issues.” Facebook Messenger is now available as a desktop app. Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin will have gotten a grant to make a digital archive of the records from the Central Lunatic Asylum for Colored Insane in…
  • Saturday Afternoon Buzz, April 11, 2015

    ResearchBuzz
    11 Apr 2015 | 11:40 am
    NEW RESOURCES The Hoover Institution has released a new iPad app (PRESS RELEASE). “The launch of the app concludes a comprehensive process, which helped identify what Hoover followers most care about in terms of content, research and access to ideas. The app contains tens of thousands of pieces of content organized so that information can be found and discovered in a logical and intuitive fashion, no matter the topic or media format. The simplified menu and filtering tools improve ease of use by incorporating restructured and streamlined research topics. For visitors looking for a…
 
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    Library Journal

  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
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    Library Journal » » Academic Libraries

  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
  • Standards, Frameworks, and the Work We Need To Do

    Barbara Fister
    16 Apr 2015 | 6:30 am
    The great debate has come to a truce: The new Framework for Information Literacy has been adopted, but will not replace the familiar information literacy Standards, at least for now. This probably frustrates people who strongly support (or oppose) one or the other, but it gives us a chance to work out some sticky issues without anyone feeling that they lost. I’m more or less in the “act locally” camp with Meredith Farkas. Librarians work in an interstitial place on our campuses where local conversations and goals matter and where stuff gets done (or doesn’t). An Association of College…
  • ACRL 2015: A Breath of Fresh Air

    LJ
    9 Apr 2015 | 10:38 am
    The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) 2015 Conference, held in Portland, OR, March 25–28, was by all accounts an upbeat event. Academic librarians may be thinking seriously about the future, but for a few temperate and surprisingly sunny days at the Oregon Convention Center—as well as online, for those taking advantage of the virtual conference—everyone involved seemed to be feeling positive about the present as well. Some 3,390 registrants attended in person, plus more than 300 virtual conferencegoers, from all 50 states and 24 countries. A record-setting 1,250 of…
  • Working With Librarians to Make Search Human Again | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    9 Apr 2015 | 7:33 am
    Internet search engines seem to be working well enough. There are plenty of choices. So why would an entrepreneur think people will want yet another one? This one has a twist. Librarians. Librarians and search engines: It’s been something of a love-hate relationship. In 1997, librarians were early advocates for a then-new search engine called Google. Page rank spoke to us, and we could explain it well. Then Google’s success had the public questioning whether libraries mattered anymore. Librarians felt challenged to defend their relevance. We’ve learned to work with and alongside…
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  • Poetry Rat | French on Fridays

    Liz French
    17 Apr 2015 | 2:43 pm
    I’m thrilled as punch that spring finally seems to have arrived….and the warmer weather does bring out the rhapsodist in me. Crocuses and daffodils poke thru the park detritus; rats gambol in the alleyways; noisy revelers clog the streets of my hipster neighborhood, in shorts and wife-beaters and winter caps (yes, that’s still a fashion thing in the ‘burg, though luckily we seem to have moved beyond the tube-socks-with-miniskirts phase); pent-up schoolkids stream happily into the subways for class trips….New York awakens to springtime. All right, I’m not much of a poet. But since…
  • The Latest from Greg Iles, Norah Vincent on Virginia Woolf, an Unconventional Kate Walbert | Fiction Reviews, April 15, 2015

    LJ Reviews
    17 Apr 2015 | 2:12 pm
    Iles, Greg. The Bone Tree. Morrow. Apr. 2015. 816p. ISBN 9780062311115. pap. $27.99; ebk. ISBN 9780062311146. F Penn Cage and fiancée Caitlin Masters doggedly continue their search for the truth behind a series of murders from the 1960s. Past secrets have resurfaced to haunt Penn’s father, Dr. Tom Cage. When Tom is accused of killing his former nurse, he jumps bail to evade the far-extending reach of the Double Eagles, a Ku Klux Klan secret cell. Frank Knox, the deceased Double Eagles leader, was rumored to have been highly involved with the assassination of John F. Kennedy. Tracking this…
  • New Authors Alvar, Clifford, Drager, Ohanesian, Walker, & Many Others | Debut Fiction, April 15, 2015

    LJ Reviews
    17 Apr 2015 | 12:59 pm
    Alvar, Mia. In the Country. Knopf. Jun. 2015. 368p. ISBN 9780385352819. $25.95; ebk. ISBN 9780385352840. F Few writers, even the most seasoned, can produce collections of evenly superb stories. Alvar triumphs on her first try. Her nine stories reflect her own peripatetic background (Manila born, Bahrain/New York raised, Harvard/Columbia educated), featuring a cast of immigrants, expats, travelers, runaways, and returnees caught in constant motion—geographically, socioeconomically, politically, emotionally—as they search for respite and long for an elusive “home.” A pharmacist returns…
  • Needle and Thread: Five Books To Refresh Your Collections | Wyatt’s World

    Neal Wyatt
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:51 am
    “Sewing” books range from dress patterns to appliqué, from needlepoint to embroidery. Here are five key titles that will update collections and please sewists of all kinds. Alabama Studio Sewing Patterns: A Guide to Customizing a Hand-Stitched Alabama Chanin Wardrobe by Natalie Chanin (Melanie Falick: STC Craft). Known for hand embellishments and customization in fit and style, the Alabama Studio designs are cult favorites with many sewists. This collection gathers patterns from the previous books and presents several new ones as well. The Needlepoint Book, 3d ed. by Jo Ippolito…
  • Sarah Addison Allen, John Vaillant, with Bios of Stonewall Jackson and the Equal Justice Initiative | Audiobook Reviews, April 15, 2015

    LJ Reviews
    17 Apr 2015 | 9:59 am
    Allen, Sarah Addison. First Frost. (Waverley Family, Bk. 2). 7 CDs. 9 hrs. Brilliance. 2015. ISBN 9781469222059. $29.99. 1 MP3-CD, Playaway digital. F Descended from “a family of unusuals,” the Waverley sisters practice mystical arts: Claire’s flower-infused recipes alter behavior; Sydney’s hairstyles ensure or deflect success. Their family tree, a moody specimen that blooms in winter, dispenses future-glimpsing apples. But magic doesn’t safeguard the women from troubles, including unfulfilled hopes for a son, a repressive business venture, and identity issues rooted in their…
 
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  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
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  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
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  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
 
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    Library Journal

  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
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  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
 
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  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
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    Library Journal

  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
 
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    Library Journal

  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
 
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    Library Journal Reviews » » Prepub Alert

  • Get Your Free Ebook Copies of Brian Grazer’s A Curious Mind for National Library Week

    Barbara Hoffert
    13 Apr 2015 | 7:51 am
    In another example of its expanding ebook outreach to libraries, Simon & Schuster announced that it will donate a free electronic copy of Academy Award–winning producer Brian Grazer’s new book, A Curious Mind: The Secret to a Bigger Life, to school and public libraries for every ebook or hardcover book sold at retail, up to 5,000 copies. The book, coauthored by three-time Loeb Award–winning journalist Charles Fishman, chronicles the “curiosity conversations” that Grazer (Splash, A Beautiful Mind) has conducted for decades with accomplished individuals from Barack Obama to Jonas…
  • From Night Vale to Elizabeth George, a Debut Worth $2 Million, & More | Barbara’s Fiction Picks, Oct. 2015, Pt. 2

    Barbara Hoffert
    13 Apr 2015 | 7:31 am
    Fink, Joseph & Jeffrey Cranor. Welcome to Night Vale. HarperPerennial. Oct. 2015. 416p. ISBN 9780062351425. $19.99; ebk. ISBN 9780062351449. CD: HarperAudio. POP FICTION Surely you’ve heard of Night Vale, that funky little town in the eponymous (and bubbling-over popular) podcast and touring show created by Fink and cowritten by him and Cranor. The library figures largely there, one reason we’re pleased to welcome the authors to this year’s Day of Dialog. Ghosts, angels, and aliens also sweep through the town, and government conspiracies are part of daily life. In this novel, based…
  • Julian Barnes, James Bowen, Roger Lowenstein, David Talbot | Barbara’s Nonfiction Picks, October 2015, Pt. 2

    Barbara Hoffert
    13 Apr 2015 | 7:22 am
    Barnes, Julian. Keeping an Eye Open: Essays on Art. Knopf. Oct. 2015. 288p. ISBN 9781101874783. $30; ebk. ISBN 9781101874790. ART/ESSAYS Winner of a Man Booker Prize (among numerous other honors) and a best-selling author to boot, novelist Barnes here collects 17 of his essays on art. That’s not so unexpected, really, when you consider that his 1989 novel, A History of the World in 10 1/2 Chapters, has a chapter on Géricault’s magnificent The Raft of the Medusa. As Barnes himself says, “Flaubert believed that…great paintings required no words of explanation. Braque thought the ideal…
  • Top Mystery from Alexander McCall Smith, Ashley Weaver, & More | Fiction Previews, Oct. 2015, Pt. 2

    Barbara Hoffert
    13 Apr 2015 | 7:09 am
    Alexander, Tasha. The Adventuress: A Lady Emily Mystery. Minotaur: St. Martin’s. Oct. 2015. 304p. ISBN 9781250058263. $25.99; ebk. ISBN 9781466876071. CD/downloadable: Macmillan Audio. MYSTERY In this latest in the New York Times best-selling series, following The Counterfeit Heiress, Lady Emily Hargreaves heads to the French Riviera (and who wouldn’t?) to attend the nuptials of her friend Jeremy, Duke of Bainbridge, and American heiress Amity Wells. Alas, one of Jeremy’s friends is poisoned and his body found in Jeremy’s hotel suite, which rather puts a damper on things. Was Jeremy…
  • Four Essential Sci/Med Titles from Tim Flannery, Lisa Randall, & More | Nonfiction Previews, October 2015, Pt. 2

    Barbara Hoffert
    13 Apr 2015 | 6:52 am
    Flannery, Tim. Atmosphere of Hope: The Search for Solutions to the Climate Crisis. Atlantic Monthly. Oct. 2015. 256p. ISBN 9780802124067. $27; ebk. ISBN9780802190925. NATURE Ten years ago, Flannery helped jump-start the conversation on climate change with The Weather Makers, a No. 1 international best seller that was named an ALA Notable Book and has over 150,000 copies in print. Now we’ve moved from change to crisis, but Flannery refuses to despair. Even as we figure out how to survive the severe weather that’s become the new normal, we can move forward with Flannery’s proposals here,…
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    Library Journal

  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
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    Library Journal

  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
 
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    Library Journal Reviews » » Reference

  • Q&A: Roger Jänecke

    Henrietta Verma
    15 Apr 2015 | 11:57 am
    LJ recently spoke to Roger Jänecke of Visible Ink Press about trends in reference and how his company has responded to them over the years. Lately we’ve been receiving fewer reference books at LJ, and they tend to be either list-type browsing material or high-end scholarly works. Your titles fall in the middle. Can you tell us about your niche and how you’re making it work? Good question. Sometimes I wonder how we’re making it work! Still, when talking to the fans of our authors or of our book series, I am always struck by our readers’ passion for the topics covered by our…
  • Issues & Controversies; Chilton Library | Reference eReviews, April 1, 2015

    LJ Reviews
    10 Apr 2015 | 1:52 pm
    Issues & Controversies Infobase Publishing; infobasepublishing.com. To request a free trial, call 800-322-8755, email onlinesales@infobaselearning.com, or visit fofweb.com/trial/ By Cheryl LaGuardia CONTENT Infobase’s recently relaunched Issues & Controversies (I&C) is designed to “inspire thought-provoking debates” with over 24,000 searchable articles that present both sides of an issue unbiasedly. Content comes from news organizations, magazines and journals, groups and institutes, and government agencies; most of this content is updated weekly. Headline news is updated…
  • Atlas of Knowledge, All Things Nutrition, Dictionary of Dreams, Secrets of the Universe | Reference Reviews, April 1, 2015

    LJ Reviews
    10 Apr 2015 | 1:42 pm
    atlases Börner, Katy. Atlas of Knowledge: Anyone Can Map. MIT. 2015. 224p. illus. maps. bibliog. ISBN 9780262028813. $39.95. REF This is the second of three “atlases” intended as companion volumes to the ongoing exhibition Places & Spaces: Mapping Science, traveling and evolving in content since 2005. The project aims to introduce and promote the new dimension of information or knowledge visualization described as “science mapping”; it can be explored on the website scimaps.org, which also displays all of the maps from the exhibition reproduced in the derivative publications.
  • Ferguson Report To Be Published by New Press

    Henrietta Verma
    1 Apr 2015 | 11:05 am
    The New Press will publish paperback (ISBN 9781620971604) and ebook (ISBN 9781620971659) editions of the U.S. Department of Justice’s Ferguson report, the result of the department’s investigation of the Ferguson, MO, police department after one of its police officers killed the unarmed Michael Brown on August 9, 2014. Either version of the document will cost $10. The report, which shows that citizens of Ferguson have routinely been cited for infractions such as “manner of walking on roadway,” is available online at ow.ly/KBltl, but the book will also include an introduction by…
  • Asian Film Online | Reference eReviews, March 15, 2015

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    23 Mar 2015 | 10:39 am
    Asian Film Online Alexander Street Press; alexanderstreet.com/products/asian-film-online-series. To request a free trial please call ­703-212-8520, ext. 127 or email support@alexanderstreet.com. By Cheryl LaGuardia CONTENT Asian Film Online: Volume 1 is a streaming video collection of nearly 690 feature films, documentaries, animations, and shorts selected by film scholars and critics. The films represent 24 Asian countries and contain a broad cultural perspective from across the Asian continent. Included in the resource are movies from notable directors in China (Xie Fei), Iran (Dariush…
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    Library Journal

  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
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    Library Journal

  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
 
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    Library Journal

  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
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    Library Journal

  • Louisville Libraries Help Train Local Talent For Tech Jobs

    LJ
    17 Apr 2015 | 11:49 am
    Kentucky’s Louisville Free Public Library (LFPL) is teaming with government agencies, nonprofits, and businesses in its community to teach people to develop websites and program software—and once those skills are honed, getting them placed in tech jobs around the region. Like many cities, Louisville hosts a thriving technology sector, but companies have had some trouble addressing shortages of qualified software developers, a perennial problem in the industry. In the fall of 2013, former LFPL Director (and 2010 LJ Librarian of the Year) Craig Buthod and LFPL Director of Communication and…
  • Say What You Really Mean

    LJ
    16 Apr 2015 | 1:51 pm
    Presented by: Rowman & Littlefield & Library Journal Event Date & Time: Thursday, May 14th, 2015, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM ET / 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT Throughout history, women have not been given the same opportunities to speak up as men have had. From arranged marriages to legal restrictions, women were often relegated to social roles that prohibited free speech. In recent years with the rise of postmodern feminism, certain rights have been won, and women are enjoying greater freedom of expression than ever before. However, barriers remain. In the 21st century, some women…
  • Updates and Big Kudos to Portland State University Library | Not Dead Yet

    Cheryl LaGuardia
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:36 am
    Given a number of good news items that came across my desk recently, I thought it’d be worthwhile highlighting some of them for readers, since some follow up on past posts and people, while another describes great work by Portland State University Library. Allison Gofman, the student who created the wonderful online Harvard Libraries: Books That Breathe (described in the June 19, 2014 Not Dead Yet), wrote to let me know she is starting library school at Simmons School of Library and Information Science this fall. Hurrah! She’ll be a great addition to the profession. Kyle Courtney,…
  • Internet Access in the Library: U. of Maryland’s iPAC & ALA Release Results of “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries” Survey

    Gary Price
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:01 am
    Here’s a new report from the University of Maryland’s Information Policy and Access Center (iPAC) and the American Library Association. From a News Release: Broadband speeds in U.S. public libraries have improved significantly in recent years yet continues to lag behind national broadband connectivity standards, according to “Broadband Quality in Public Libraries,” a new supplementary summary report released jointly today by the American Library Association (ALA) and the Information Policy & Access Center (iPAC) at the University of Maryland College Park as part of the…
  • Faculty Rallies to Support University of Oregon Archivist

    Lisa Peet
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:56 am
    Knight Library, University of Oregon (photo credit: User: Akendall, via Wikimedia Commons) [This article has been updated to reflect the input of UO dean of libraries Adriene Lim.] More than 100 faculty members at the University of Oregon (UO) have signed a letter to the university administration supporting archivist James Fox, who has been informed that his contract will not be renewed in June. Fox, along with digital archivist Kira Homo, is at the center of a controversy involving the release of some 22,000 pages of unfiltered UO presidential archives to professor of economics Bill Harbaugh…
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    Library Journal Reviews » » In the Bookroom

  • Poetry Rat | French on Fridays

    Liz French
    17 Apr 2015 | 2:43 pm
    I’m thrilled as punch that spring finally seems to have arrived….and the warmer weather does bring out the rhapsodist in me. Crocuses and daffodils poke thru the park detritus; rats gambol in the alleyways; noisy revelers clog the streets of my hipster neighborhood, in shorts and wife-beaters and winter caps (yes, that’s still a fashion thing in the ‘burg, though luckily we seem to have moved beyond the tube-socks-with-miniskirts phase); pent-up schoolkids stream happily into the subways for class trips….New York awakens to springtime. All right, I’m not much of a poet. But since…
  • Q&A: Laura van den Berg | Debut Spotlight, April 15, 2015

    Neal Wyatt
    16 Apr 2015 | 2:19 pm
    Photo © Paul Yoon Laura van den Berg’s debut novel, Find Me (LJ 1/15), published after two well-received story collections (The Isle of Youth and What the World Will Look Like When All the Water Leaves Us), is getting rave reviews. LJ reviewer Christine DeZelar-Tiedman gave it a star, deemed it “highly recommended,” and compared the literary postapocalyptic novel to Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale and Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go. In this interview, van den Berg discusses the world she creates, the popularity of dystopian fiction, and her own reading interests. What do…
  • Q&A: Roger Jänecke

    Henrietta Verma
    15 Apr 2015 | 11:57 am
    LJ recently spoke to Roger Jänecke of Visible Ink Press about trends in reference and how his company has responded to them over the years. Lately we’ve been receiving fewer reference books at LJ, and they tend to be either list-type browsing material or high-end scholarly works. Your titles fall in the middle. Can you tell us about your niche and how you’re making it work? Good question. Sometimes I wonder how we’re making it work! Still, when talking to the fans of our authors or of our book series, I am always struck by our readers’ passion for the topics covered by our…
  • Creature Features & Evil Acts | What We’re Reading

    Liz French
    14 Apr 2015 | 11:11 am
    The LJ/School Library Journal WWR crew explores its animal side, plays card tricks, delves into outer space, and balances the cozy with the hard-boiled. Next week we’ll be poetic as all get out, so do come back now! Mahnaz Dar, Associate Editor, SLJ Reviews This week I’m continuing with poetry, a format I’ve often found a bit perplexing but that I’m currently enjoying. I’m still reading T.S. Eliot’s Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats and really digging our boy Tom’s take on felines. (I hate to attribute my growing appreciation for poetry to Andrew Lloyd Webber—shh, readers,…
  • Writing To Remember: A 20th-Century Tragedy Inspires a Debut Novel

    LJ Reviews
    14 Apr 2015 | 8:23 am
    Photo by Raffi Hadidian I was only a child when my great-grandmother Elizabeth first told me about her past. She was only four when in 1915 the Ottoman empire, on the verge of collapse, issued a pogrom to eliminate the Christian population of the empire. Millions of Christian Armenians were deported from their towns and villages and marched to the Syrian desert. An estimated 1.5 million died as a result of mass killings, starvation, and other cruelties. Both my paternal grandparents were also survivors. They rarely talked about their history, but it was forever present in the songs and poetry…
 
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    Annoyed Librarian

  • Banned Posters Week

    Annoyed Librarian
    16 Apr 2015 | 3:00 am
    There’s controversy brewing in the library community because a lot of librarians like to find stuff to get upset about to distract themselves from how boring their jobs are. The latest controversy is over a Banned Books Week poster. Yes, it’s a poster you can buy, and people are upset about it because they don’t […]
  • Different Ways to Celebrate Libraries

    Annoyed Librarian
    13 Apr 2015 | 3:00 am
    It’s National Library Week again, and once again it annoys me. It’s not the week itself, but the pretense behind it and the vague “celebrating” that doesn’t seem tied to anything real. First sponsored in 1958, National Library Week is a national observance sponsored by the American Library Association (ALA) and libraries across the country […]
  • Why the Link of the Day?

    Annoyed Librarian
    9 Apr 2015 | 3:00 am
    So this story was the Library Link of the Day yesterday. It reports that Walmart is refusing to stock a book by someone named Ronda Rousey because Rousey “has been deemed too violent.” Rousey is apparently the “UFC’s biggest star,” which meant absolutely nothing to me. UFC is, according to Wikipedia, the Ultimate Fighting Championship, […]
  • Hire a Librarian Next Time

    Annoyed Librarian
    6 Apr 2015 | 3:00 am
    Librarians get no respect, we all know that. People don’t even know what librarians do most of the time. There’s a cliched reaction to what librarians do that’s similar to what I’ve been told happens to English teachers. Supposedly, if you tell someone you’re an English teacher, they usually say, “Oh, I’d better watch my […]
  • Beware of False Oppressions

    Annoyed Librarian
    2 Apr 2015 | 3:00 am
    The so-called “religious freedom” act passed in Indiana has certainly been getting a lot of attention. Even the ALA President has weighed in on the matter. ALA’s Task Force on Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion is calling for input from the membership—how can we best engage our host communities when ALA holds its conference in the […]
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    In the Library with the Lead Pipe

  • Randall Munroe’s What If as a Test Case for Open Access in Popular Culture

    Nancy Foasberg
    8 Apr 2015 | 3:30 am
    Randall Munroe, What If. CC-BY-NC 2.5. Retrieved from http://what-if.xkcd.com/127/   In Brief: Open access to scholarly research benefits not only the academic world but also the general public. Questions have been raised about the popularity of academic materials for nonacademic readers. However, when scholarly materials are available, they are also available to popularizers who can recontextualize them in unexpected and more accessible ways. Randall Munroe’s blog/comic What If uses open access scholarly and governmental documents to answer bizarre hypothetical questions submitted by…
  • A radical publishing collective: the Journal of Radical Librarianship

    Simon Barron
    25 Mar 2015 | 3:30 am
    From Flickr user, Julian Stallbrass, licensed under CC BY 2.0. Image has been cropped. In Brief: the Journal of Radical Librarianship is a new open-access journal publishing scholarly work in the field of radical librarianship. The focus on critical approaches to librarianship and anti-marketisation of information is reflected not only in our subject matter but in our publishing model, our licensing model, and our organisational practices. We hope to foster open and engaging discussions about radical approaches to librarianship and information studies. There’s a growing amount of discussion…
  • #DitchTheSurvey: Expanding Methodological Diversity in LIS Research

    Rebecca Halpern
    11 Mar 2015 | 3:00 am
    Survey rating scale: Allie Brosh, Hyperbole and a Half, CC-BY-NC-ND 3.0 United States License. Retrieved from http://hyperboleandahalf.blogspot.com/2010/02/boyfriend-doesnt-have-ebola-probably.html In Brief: Recent content analyses of LIS literature show that, by far, the most popular data collection method employed by librarians and library researchers is the survey. The authors of this article, all participants in the 2014 Institute for Research Design in Librarianship, recognize that there are sound reasons for using a survey. However, like any one method, its very nature limits the types…
  • Beyond the Threshold: Conformity, Resistance, and the ACRL Information Literacy Framework for Higher Education

    Ian Beilin
    25 Feb 2015 | 5:30 am
    Photo by Flickr user laroyo (CC BY-NC 2.0) In Brief: The recently adopted ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education has generated much critique and discussion, including many important reflections on the nature of information literacy and librarianship itself. This article provides a brief consideration of some of these responses and as well a critique of the Framework from the perspective of critical information literacy. It argues that although the Framework demonstrably opens up possibilities for an information literacy instruction that encourages students to question…
  • A Conversation with Librarian-Editors

    Ellie Collier
    28 Jan 2015 | 5:00 am
    In brief: Ellie Collier interviews several librarian-editors about the publishing process, with a focus on “call for chapters” style books. Introduction: I began working on In the Library with the Lead Pipe in 2008 as a founding editor and author, despite hating to write. The prospect seemed too exciting to let my own dislike of writing get in the way. I was the first editorial board member to step off of our initial author rotation and I remain grateful that the board let me stay on in an editorial role only, stepping back into a writing role from time to time to share survey results or…
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    Library Stuff

  • New features on Wikipedia iOS app help readers access, explore, and share knowledge

    Steven M. Cohen
    16 Apr 2015 | 7:04 am
    “Each month, nearly half a billion people turn to Wikipedia for everything from preserving cultural heritage, to improving cancer detection, to researching homework. Today, the Wikimedia Foundation is excited to release an update to the official Wikipedia mobile app for iOS. It includes big, beautiful images at the top of every article, the ability to share quick facts and images with your social networks, improved search, and suggestions for further discovery. The updated app is available for iOS users today.” (via Wikimedia blog)
  • Scribd Expands Audiobook Catalog in Deal With Penguin Random House

    Steven M. Cohen
    16 Apr 2015 | 6:31 am
    “E-book subscription services are bulking up and expanding their libraries and services, as the competition to become the Netflix of books escalates. On Thursday, the subscription reading service Scribd announced that it would add more than 9,000 audiobooks from Penguin Random House Audio to its platform, increasing its audiobook catalog to more than 45,000 titles. The deal will give Scribd’s subscribers access to narrations of popular titles by authors like Lena Dunham, John Grisham, Gillian Flynn and George R.R. Martin.” (via NYTimes.com)
  • Envisioning a Colorado Haven for Readers, Nestled Amid Mountains of Books

    Steven M. Cohen
    16 Apr 2015 | 6:08 am
    “The project is striking in its ambition: a sprawling research institution situated on a ranch at 10,000 feet above sea level, outfitted with 32,000 volumes, many of them about the Rocky Mountain region, plus artists’ studios, dormitories and a dining hall — a place for academics, birders, hikers and others to study and savor the West. It is the sort of endeavor undertaken by a deep-pocketed politician or chief executive, perhaps a Bloomberg or a Buffett. But the project, called the Rocky Mountain Land Library, has instead two booksellers as its founders.” (via NYTimes.com)
  • State Library of Victoria given $5 million in rare books

    Steven M. Cohen
    16 Apr 2015 | 5:55 am
    “A late Melbourne QC’s rare English book collection, estimated to be worth more than $5 million, has been given to the State Library of Victoria. The 5000 works, mostly from the 15th to 18th century, were collected over 46 years by barrister, physicist and bibliophile John Emmerson, who died last year aged 76. In his will, he asked that his personal library, which lined five rooms at his South Yarra mansion, remain intact, in a Melbourne institution.” (via SMH)
  • New Orleans’s Once-destroyed Public Libraries a Strong and Necessary Component of Civic Infrastructure

    Steven M. Cohen
    16 Apr 2015 | 5:33 am
    “Shoring up the libraries of New Orleans with a proposed property tax increase will secure “one of the bright and hopeful” lights of civic infrastructure that is still, after nearly 10 years, working to recover from the ravages of Hurricane Katrina, according to New Orleans Times-Picayune contributing op-ed columnist Gordon “Nick” Mueller. Most of the 13 branches of the city’s 110-year old library system were destroyed in 2005 by Katrina’s floodwaters. Thousands of volumes, collections, and holdings were lost, and post-storm assessments observed fish in library parking lots,…
 
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    The 'M' Word - Marketing Libraries

  • Doing National Library Week Right: TSCPL

    ~Kathy Dempsey
    13 Apr 2015 | 8:13 am
    Yesterday marked the start of National Library Week (#NLW15) in the US. Many libraries of all types do things to take advantage of this time, when ALA and other organizations have already primed the media to do library stories. Some, understandably, do more than others.I'd like to show you a prime example of a public library that's done #NLW15 right. Take a look at the Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library (TSCPL) in Topeka, Kansas. On its Facebook page yesterday, the opening day of National Library Week, TSCPL posted a short teaser note and video. (It's just 26 seconds if you want…
  • Enter the JCD Awards by March 6

    ~Kathy Dempsey
    18 Feb 2015 | 5:00 am
    { UPDATE: Feb. 26. The entry deadline has been extended to March 6. That gives you an extra week to prepare your entry! ~KD }It's that time of year again---time to enter the John Cotton Dana Library Public Relations Award contest. Once again, eight exceptional PR campaigns will win $10,000 each to further their work, thanks to the H.W. Wilson Foundation and to EBSCO.All types of libraries are welcome to enter, and international entries are welcome. However, entries must be written in English for the award jury. The John Cotton Dana (JCD) entry process is now entirely online, so you…
  • Time to Enter the PR Xchange Awards Contest

    ~Kathy Dempsey
    17 Feb 2015 | 4:12 pm
    Calling all library people who do PR work! You're invited to enter the PR Xchange Awards! The deadline is April 1st.The 2015 PR Xchange Awards will recognize the very best public relations materials produced by all types of North American libraries in 2014. This contest is part of the popular PR Xchange event that’s held at ALA’s Annual Conference; it was formerly called the Best of Show Awards.There are 10 categories for entries, including annual reports and fundraising materials. You can find details and a link to the entry form here. There’s an FAQ document here. Online submissions…
  • Share Stories, Earn Money

    ~Kathy Dempsey
    10 Feb 2015 | 10:04 am
    Library vendor Gale (part of Cengage Learning) has a wonderful website called My Library Story. As it explains: For each story submitted to the My Library Story community (through February 28, 2015), Gale will donate $1 to an advertising fund used to promote libraries through mainstream media during National Library Week 2015. You can contribute! Share your own story and encourage others to share their experiences as well.This is great... but it could use LOTS more contributions. As of today, the running total is just $189. With all of the librarians and users in the US, this should…
  • Sign Up TODAY for One of These Marketing Courses!

    ~Kathy Dempsey
    30 Jan 2015 | 11:10 am
    I've recently learned about two online library marketing courses that are starting on Monday, February 2. Here's basic info on both:Marketing the 21st Century Library, taught by Debra Lucas-Alfierivia Simmons CollegeFeb. 1 – Feb. 28, 2015$250 (Simmons GSLIS Alumni Price $200)What you earn: Continuing education credit"Marketing in the 21st century library is a four-week course designed for MLS candidates, graduates, librarians and paraprofessionals who are charged with creating marketing and promotions plans." More info and the registration link are here.Library Advocacy Unshushed, taught by…
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    Stephen's Lighthouse

  • Special Discount: Information Services Today An Introduction Edited by Sandra Hirsh

    Stephen Abram
    17 Apr 2015 | 10:22 am
    Special Discounts with the attached PDF flyer for:  Information Services Today: An Introduction As a collection of 39 chapters addressing 7 key areas within the LIS field, I truly believe the success of this book lies within its historical context of the field, its current relevance to today’s complex LIS environment, its identification of essential and emerging issues, and its wealth of resources, tips, and strategies that will guide LIS students and professionals in their academic and professional pursuits. Promotion of the book has already begun and includes a combination of…
  • Friday Fun: 25 annoying phrases you should stop saying at work

    Stephen Abram
    17 Apr 2015 | 3:53 am
    25 annoying phrases you should stop saying at work Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/business-phrases-2015-3#ixzz3VsvgUsBA I’ll admit to using many of these… “At the end of the day Back to the drawing board Hit the ground running Get the ball rolling Low hanging fruit Thrown under the bus Think outside the box Let’s touch base Get my manager’s blessing It’s on my radar Ping me I don’t have the bandwidth No brainer Par for the course Bang for your buck Synergy Move the goal post Apples to apples Win-win Circle back around All hands on deck Take…
  • Top 10 Ways to Break Bad Habits

    Stephen Abram
    17 Apr 2015 | 3:49 am
    Top 10 Ways to Break Bad Habits http://lifehacker.com/top-10-ways-to-break-bad-habits-1694247761 “10. Fine Yourself for Each Offense  9. Understand What Triggers Your Bad Habits 8. Go Slow and Make Tiny Changes 7. Spend a Month Thinking About Your Habit Before Taking Action 6. Remind Your Future Self About Avoiding Bad Habits 5. Change Your Environment 4. Coach Yourself Out of Bad Habits 3. Do a Review When You Have a Bad Habit Relapse 2. Create an If-Then Plan 1. Train Yourself to Think Differently About Your Bad Habits” Stephen
  • 15 Insanely Useful Diagrams For People Who Love Books

    Stephen Abram
    17 Apr 2015 | 3:14 am
    15 Insanely Useful Diagrams For People Who Love Books http://www.buzzfeed.com/mallorymcinnis/charts-for-people-who-love-to-read#.vxPnVw2x7 “1. A flowchart to find your (literary) love story. goodreads.com Created by Goodreads. 2. A guide to book and wine pairings. gonereading.com Created by Gone Reading. 3. Helpful (and ridiculous) ways to recycle a book you can no longer read. lovereading.co.uk Created by Lovereading UK. 4. A guide to words that you never knew came from literature. lovereading.co.uk Created by Lovereading UK. 5. Hmmmmm—what Shakespeare play should you read next?
  • Borrowing ebooks from a library (infographic)

    Stephen Abram
    16 Apr 2015 | 12:32 pm
    Borrowing ebooks from a library (infographic) http://ebookfriendly.com/borrowing-ebooks-libraries-infographic/ Stephen
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    Tame The Web

  • What’s the big idea?! Incorporating Threshold Concepts Keynote (post by TTW Contributor Troy Swanson)

    troyswanson
    16 Apr 2015 | 8:14 am
    Amy Hofer, Sylvia Lu, and Lori Townsend’s keynote at the 2015 Information Literacy Summit (Illinois). They discuss their research and thinking about information literacy threshold concepts, which underlie ACRL’s Information Literacy Framework for Higher Education. The IL Summit is a partnership between the Moraine Valley Community College Library and the DePaul University Libraries. Description: When introduced to threshold concepts, librarians usually ask “How do I use them?” Yet this question hopscotches another: “Do I understand threshold concepts and how they relate to…
  • Building a Minecraft Community

    Cathy
    16 Apr 2015 | 4:14 am
    You won’t want to miss reading about this library’s innovative experiment with Minecraft to build a community of young users. John Blyberg, assistant director for innovation and user experience at the Darien (CT) Library has turned his “public library into a gathering spot for friends new and old, and a place to decompress” simply by running a single server for Minecraft users. To read more about Blyberg’s innovative way to build an “afterschool sanctuary” follow this link: http://www.slj.com/2015/04/technology/my-public-library-minecraft-community/#_  
  • Making Libraries Habit-forming! — A TTW Guest Post by Susan Musson

    Cathy
    13 Apr 2015 | 6:00 am
    The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg (2012) has been on my books-to-read list for over a year now so I was quite pleased to see it included in the list of suggestions for this Context Book assignment. My only hesitation was that I was unsure how a book on habits could be applied to the library community. I needn’t have worried. This book is not a ‘self-help’ manual, and Charles Duhigg is not a therapist or neurologist. He’s a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist which is evident in his conversational tone and investigative style. He describes…
  • Upcoming Presentations Spring & Summer 2015

    Michael
    9 Apr 2015 | 1:54 pm
    April 26: MOOC Workshop, Computers in Libraries 2015, Washington, DC. April 28, 2015: Keynote – Learning Everywhere: Users, Empathy, and Reflective Practice, Connecticut Library Association Conference, Mystic, Connecticut, May 4, 2015: Learning Everywhere, Florida Library Webinars, online. May 29, 2015: Learning Everywhere: The Transformative Power of Hyperlinked Libraries, Prescott Valley, Arizona, for the Arizona Library Association. June 5, 2015: Opening Keynote, Technologies and Trends Workshop, Grand Valley State University, Mary Idema Pew Library, for the Michigan Library…
  • MOOC Workshop at CIL with Wendy Newman!

    Michael
    8 Apr 2015 | 8:14 am
    We interviewed Computers in Libraries 2015 speaker Michael Stephens about why he thinks opportunities for learning everywhere are so important to our library community. Read below for his answers and make sure to attend the workshop he is teaching with Wendy Newman. Dr. Michael Stephens Assistant Professor San Jose State University & Tame the Web Question 1: What key library issues are you most concerned about for the coming year? M.S.- I think it’s an ongoing issue that each and every library find the best and most useful ways  to tap into community needs. Librarians need to be…
 
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    Informania

  • Three For: School Library Sites

    Fran Bullington
    21 Mar 2015 | 7:12 am
    I thought I’d check to see what other schools are doing in conjunction with March Madness and came across some sites that are exceptional – each for different reasons.  Thought I’d share! Lake Forest High School – I love the “Now Quoting” idea – what a great idea to generate interest in a book!  See their quotes for the book Unraveling. Severn School – Book, Line, and Sinker – The Middle School Maker Fair seems to have been a successful venture.  Awesome idea to extend the library and our  image. Pleasant Grove High School –…
  • National Information Literacy Awareness Month

    Fran Bullington
    17 Oct 2012 | 3:24 am
    It’s been three years since President Barack Obama proclaimed October as National Information Literacy Awareness Month.  This year I served on a committee to word a proclamation to present to Gov. Nikki Haley so that South Carolina could also shine the light on the importance of information literacy. Eighteen states have now followed Obama’s lead; is your state one of those?
  • Three for: Documenting Your Impact

    Fran Bullington
    4 Sep 2012 | 6:11 pm
    Creative Commons Image Attribution: http://www.flickr.com/photos/vblibrary/5762454084/ The 2012-2013 school year is upon us!  One of my goals this year is to improve my methods of assessment.  School librarians are often so busy teaching that they forget to assess the learning taking place.  Can you imagine a classroom teacher NOT assessing student learning? I hope that the three resources I have gathered for this post are as helpful/motivational to you as they have been to me. “Assessing Learning: the Missing Piece in Instruction?” by Violet H. Harada and Joan M. Yoshina is an…
  • I Love Being a Librarian

    Fran Bullington
    25 Aug 2012 | 7:30 am
    As the summer was coming to a close, I had a thought that I never imagined would enter my head:  maybe retirement wouldn’t be so bad. Who I Am at the Core I am now in my 36th year of education.  Education has been, and continues to be, part of my core.  I am a nerd from the tip of my auburn head (not so much my natural color now)  to the hot pink polished nails at the end of my toes.  As a classroom teacher for 29 years, I loved interacting with teens and our discussions about literature. I loved reading their writing (well, maybe the research papers tested my soul) and discovering…
  • Three for: Free Classroom and Library Printables

    Fran Bullington
    10 Aug 2012 | 1:33 pm
    Free quality educational resources?  Sign me up! Iowa Library Services Library Posters Iowa Library Services offers this collection of library posters in pdf format.  Print to your heart’s content! Educational Technology and Mobile Learning Thanks for culling links for us, Educational Technology and Mobile Learning Blog! 8 Great Free Technology Posters to Hang in Your Classroom Bloom’s Taxonomy Posters Venspired Learning Krissy Venosdale generously shares her creative classroom designs and posters through her blog and Flickr account.  Check them out! 12 Classroom Themes Posters…
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    Information Wants To Be Free

  • Sinners, saints, and social media take-downs

    Meredith Farkas
    13 Apr 2015 | 8:30 am
    I hate one-dimensional characters in movies and TV. I love complex characters who have good qualities and bad. I like that “The Good Wife” actually isn’t really such a paragon of moral virtue at all. That she has made questionable decisions and struggles with things, just like we all do. I like how many of the “villains” on that show do monstrous things, but still have likable qualities and people they love and who love them in turn. I’m glad we’re seeing more and more shows like that, where characters are as flawed and three-dimensional as we all…
  • You could learn a lot from us: community college librarians at ACRL

    Meredith Farkas
    9 Apr 2015 | 6:45 am
    ACRL was ridiculously amazing this year. I feel energized, affirmed, and hopeful (and completely exhausted and sick since it ended). The programming was so high-quality and relevant that, in most cases, I had at least four options in every time slot on my planner that I wanted to attend. Luckily, ACRL records all the sessions and will be putting them online in the next few weeks; there are so many I want to listen to! It’s really nice to go to a conference when you feel like you’re actually in a position to implement some of the things you’ve heard about. I have such warm…
  • True confessions

    Meredith Farkas
    31 Mar 2015 | 6:52 am
    When my brain was completely full on Thursday at the ACRL Conference, Jad Abumrad’s keynote felt like a spa for my brain. For those who don’t know, he is the co-host of Radiolab, a very cool and innovative show on NPR, and the recipient of one of those fancy schmancy MacArthur genius grants. Good call ACRL planning committee! His keynote was brilliant and it was coming at a time when I’ve been reflecting on where I am in my career now that I feel like I’m not in survival mode anymore. For those who missed Jad’s talk, here’s another one he gave two years ago…
  • Read your contract: Being OA isn’t enough

    Meredith Farkas
    18 Mar 2015 | 8:00 am
    So, I missed writing this for Open Access Week, or Fair Use Week, or Open Education Week, but I think these are topics that we should be focusing on every day of our professional lives; not just 3 weeks of the year. Imagine for a moment that you’re doing an ego search (not that I would ever do that) and you find that someone is selling an article you wrote (with your name on it) as part of a book or journal that you never contracted with. Sure, you published the article, but for a completely different publisher. Now you find that some random company is making money off your work. You…
  • Framework? Standards? I’m keeping it local.

    Meredith Farkas
    4 Feb 2015 | 5:11 pm
    I’m sure most of you have already heard that the ACRL Board has decided to adopt the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. What I think is more interesting is that they deferred action on the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education, choosing instead to take a wait-and-see approach. I think this is a very wise decision and applaud it. There certainly was no lack of concern about the Framework and the sunsetting of the Standards, as evidenced by many critical blog posts and the Open Letter to the ACRL Board, written by librarians in New Jersey…
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    The Unquiet Librarian

  • Mindmapping Our Presearch Notes: Seeing Patterns and Gaps

    The Unquiet Librarian
    17 Apr 2015 | 10:23 am
    For the last month or so, I’ve been working with a section of Honors 9th Language Arts (hopefully, another more comprehensive post coming on this endeavor later in the spring).   After completing a class study of To Kill a Mockingbird, the students selected a motif of choice and began presearching a topic of choice related to the motif.   After completing a presearch search term map and arriving at a narrowed topic (which I’ve blogged about earlier this semester), we moved forward with another and more focused round of presearch while using EasyBib to capture information sources…
  • Designing Successful Learning Structures for Literature Circles with Sarah Rust

    The Unquiet Librarian
    17 Apr 2015 | 5:15 am
    While literature circles are not a new concept, teachers are always looking for strategies to help students successfully interact and develop sustained conversations about texts.   If you are thinking about literature circles for any grade level or subject area, you will want to listen to my interview with Language Arts teacher Sarah Rust as she takes us through her planning and design process with students: Sample Conversations: Scenes from a Literature Circle Meeting in the NHS Learning Studio: Non fiction lit circles in action! #rustyq pic.twitter.com/x9FKFjU0e0 — Sarah Rust…
  • Scaffolding Student Presearch and Topic Ideas with Reading Frenzies

    The Unquiet Librarian
    3 Apr 2015 | 10:48 am
    Photo by Sean O’Connor Like many of you, we’re always looking for ways to support students in their presearch processes.  Finding starting points for topic selection is often difficult for students, especially if they have little or no experience in choosing a topic.  In late March, we collaborated with Language Arts teacher Sean O’Connor and his freshmen classes to incorporate a blend of brainstorming/writing around topic ideas and a learning structure, Reading Frenzy, he learned earlier this year from Nancy Steineke at a workshop in New Orleans.   Like us, Sean is a big…
  • Battledecks: It’s Not Just for Librarians!

    The Unquiet Librarian
    2 Apr 2015 | 5:15 am
    The Challenge  A few weeks, IB History of the Americas teacher and one of our regular collaborative partners Dan Byrne came to us with a challenge:  he needed his students to research different nationalist movements and revolutions as well as present their findings to their peers.  The dilemma?  His students were suffering a severe case of early onset SENIORITIS.  He needed a way to challenge the students with their presentation format and skills yet avoid crafting lengthy PowerPoints that were primarily an exercise in boring regurgitation. After some thought, my solution was a modified…
  • Bridge to Presearch and Growing Student Understandings: Connect, Extend, Challenge

    The Unquiet Librarian
    4 Mar 2015 | 9:13 am
    One of our ongoing goals this academic year as instructional designers has been framing the importance of process in research projects and emphasizing the frontloading of presearch experiences as a critical point of helping students select and narrow a topic of authentic interest.  As we tried to collaborate with our 11th Language Arts teachers earlier this semester, Jennifer and I wanted to experiment with the learning structure Connect, Extend, Challenge to see if we could nudge student thinking about the overarching research theme of The American Dream. We decided to do a modified…
 
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    What I Learned Today...

  • Bookmarks for April 15, 2015

    Nicole C. Engard
    15 Apr 2015 | 1:30 pm
    Today I found the following resources and bookmarked them on Delicious. eval.in Paste and execute code online. Digest powered by RSS Digest The post Bookmarks for April 15, 2015 appeared first on What I Learned Today.... Related posts: Donate A Book Day in April Oh Cool – More Ways to Find RSS Feeds for Journals Irony of Ironies
  • Bookmarks for April 12, 2015

    Nicole C. Engard
    12 Apr 2015 | 1:30 pm
    Today I found the following resources and bookmarked them on Delicious. Messenger for Mac Facebook Messenger for the desktop Digest powered by RSS Digest The post Bookmarks for April 12, 2015 appeared first on What I Learned Today.... Related posts: Social Networking on your Desktop Google Search for Macs Facebook Chat
  • Bookmarks for March 30, 2015

    Nicole C. Engard
    30 Mar 2015 | 1:30 pm
    Today I found the following resources and bookmarked them on Delicious. Scholars GeoPortal Digest powered by RSS Digest The post Bookmarks for March 30, 2015 appeared first on What I Learned Today.... Related posts: Encyclopaedia Britannica Goes — Gasp! — Wiki Can you say Kebberfegg 3 times fast Are you backing up?
  • Bookmarks for March 29, 2015

    Nicole C. Engard
    29 Mar 2015 | 1:30 pm
    Today I found the following resources and bookmarked them on Delicious. Diigo Digest powered by RSS Digest The post Bookmarks for March 29, 2015 appeared first on What I Learned Today.... Related posts: No more Delicious? Can you say Kebberfegg 3 times fast Are you backing up?
  • Bookmarks for March 27, 2015

    Nicole C. Engard
    27 Mar 2015 | 1:30 pm
    Today I found the following resources and bookmarked them on Delicious. Airport Codes Make sense of airport codes Digest powered by RSS Digest The post Bookmarks for March 27, 2015 appeared first on What I Learned Today.... Related posts: Herding Cattle Google Floor Plans Planning to Travel?
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    LJ INFOdocket

  • Interview: Archivist James Fox Says U. of Oregon Interim President’s Team Betrayed, Scapegoated Him

    Gary Price
    17 Apr 2015 | 5:39 pm
    From The Oregonian: James Fox, head of the UO Special Collections and University Archives, said during an interview in Portland that Interim President Scott Coltrane’s office should be responsible, as the “creating office,” for vetting records to remove confidential information concerning students, faculty and staff members. Instead, Fox said, Coltrane’s office transferred the responsibility to librarians in a written agreement that Fox wasn’t shown. Kira Homo — a lower-level digital archivist, who has since resigned after also being suspended with pay…
  • Research Libraries: Faculty Senate Senate Hears About Digital Initiatives at Stanford Libraries

    Gary Price
    17 Apr 2015 | 5:27 pm
    From Stanford News: Stanford University Libraries will celebrate Earth Day – April 22 – with the release of EarthWorks, its official online search tool for geographic information systems (GIS), maps and other geographic datasets, University Librarian Michael Keller told the Faculty Senate on Thursday. The new search tool allows users to browse by institution – among the collections of eight universities and the Office of Geographic Information in Massachusetts. Users also can search by data type, place name and subject. Once you’ve retrieved a map from these sources, you can…
  • New Research Article: “It Takes More than a Mandate: Factors that Contribute to Increased Rates of Article Deposit to an Institutional Repository”

    Gary Price
    17 Apr 2015 | 5:16 pm
    The following article was posted online today (April 17, 2015) and appears in the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication (Vol. 3 No. 1). Title It Takes More than a Mandate: Factors that Contribute to Increased Rates of Article Deposit to an Institutional Repository Authors Hui Zhang Oregon State University Michael Boock Oregon State University Andrea A. Wirth Oregon State University Source Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication Vol. 3 No. 1 (2015) Abstract Introduction Many institutions have open access (OA) policies that require faculty members to deposit their…
  • Full Text Online: Symantec Publishes 2015 Internet Security Threat Report + Infographics and Video

    Gary Price
    17 Apr 2015 | 2:43 pm
    When reviewing a report like the one mentioned below (links to full text report at bottom of post) it’s likely many thoughts will cross your mind including: 1. The importance of vigilant Internet security for the enterprise and a basic understanding about what you can do to keep yourself as safe as possible. A “basic understanding” can change quickly so keeping current is also key. 2. A large and expanding need for the library/librarian community to providers of unbiased and accurate security and privacy information, resources, and education. From the Exec. Summary of the…
  • Thousands of Books Rescued from Inside of Turkey’s National Library

    Gary Price
    17 Apr 2015 | 1:50 pm
    From The Daily Sabah: Following an investigation at the library about a year ago, it was discovered that more than 350,000 books had been neglected in storage and covered with spider webs. Upon the instructions of Culture and Tourism Minister Ömer Çelik, the rehabilitation of the books began immediately. Moreover, library officials discovered that tens of thousands of books were sold for TL 0.15 ($0.06) per kilogram as waste paper during the same period. Therefore, the directorate began searching for books that had actually once belonged to the library. As the organizing and up to 70…
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    American Libraries Magazine

  • My Time as an Emerging Leader

    mightybytes
    13 Apr 2015 | 3:07 pm
    I was a part of the Emerging Leaders class of 2007. The experience was transformational. I grew as a professional and became a more informed ALA member and a leader in our Association. It was also the catalyst to developing a wonderful new network of colleagues, many of whom became great friends. I have to be honest: Learning how large and complex ALA is as an organization was a bit overwhelming at first. But I gradually came to understand how one can participate and contribute as I became intimately acquainted with the work of our various divisions, committees, and assemblies. My Emerging…
  • Storytelling for Kids, Teens, and Even Adults

    ALA Magazine
    9 Apr 2015 | 3:35 pm
    In December 2014, the New Jersey State Library predicted “5 Public Library Marketing Trends to Expect in 2015.” One is “visual storytelling.” We’ve seen the rise of this in social media and online news. Do we even read the story now if there is no accompanying picture? But it is the story that is important. Aesop used fables to teach a particular character trait; similar stories are used today to help children learn how the world works. Myths explained physical phenomena in the absence of scientific knowledge. Television dramas entertain, and human interest stories can compel us to…
  • An Unconventional Librarian

    Mariam Pera
    6 Apr 2015 | 6:12 am
    Browsing the website for the American Association of Law Libraries, Andrea Muto came across a job posting looking for someone to create bench guides. “I thought, ‘Law degree? Check. Library degree? Check. Location? Kabul. Wait—what?’” says Muto. “It seemed insane. Try to explain to anyone, let alone your parents, why you’d want to work in Afghanistan in 2007.” Muto interviewed, packed up, and flew out anyway. She had worked at LexisNexis for 10 years after finishing an MLIS at Kent State University and a JD at Cleveland-Marshall College of Law in Ohio. She was a ready for a…
  • The Bohemian Librarian

    mightybytes
    6 Apr 2015 | 5:39 am
    In the middle of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, Vir­ginia Sanchez spends her day establishing order. She sorts through the collection of materials she inherited with her new job—some of which sits in boxes. The work keeps her busy, but she’s eagerly waiting for a call to help off-site with another project. Sanchez says part of her job as librarian of Yosemite National Park includes going on bear team expeditions with the rangers to count cubs and track the population. It’s not at all what she envisioned herself doing while in library school in Arizona, but she’s thrilled at this new…
  • In College, Time Is Money

    mightybytes
    2 Apr 2015 | 8:34 am
    As graduation seasons approaches, college students around the country are preparing to embark on their careers—and preparing themselves to pay for the degree they earned. According to the Institute for College Access and Success, from 1993 to 2012, average student debt rose from $9,450 to $29,400. Additionally, the number of seniors graduating with loans has increased from 47% to 71%. Data for heads of households under 40 years of age shows that student debt results in higher levels of credit card, auto loan, and other debt. The problem is even worse for non-graduates, who accrue per-credit…
 
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