Libraries

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Video Gear – Don’t Overdo it!

    David Lee King
    David Lee King
    18 Sep 2014 | 6:30 am
    I’m working on a music video for my library right now, so lighting, audio, and video equipment is pretty fresh in my head at the moment (more on that video later). If you make video of any type for your library (and you should be!), here’s something to remember: don’t overdo it. Remember your end-goal. The goal really isn’t a professionally-polished video (although that’s nice). The goal isn’t to have crystal-clear, audiophile-quality sound (although that’s nice). The goal isn’t to have pristine lighting (although, again … that’s nice).
  • California Library Leadership Failed

    Librarian in Black Blog – Sarah Houghton
    Sarah
    29 Aug 2014 | 11:26 am
    Last Friday, August 22nd, the California State Senate voted unanimously to confirm Governor Brown’s nomination of Greg Lucas as California State Librarian. When Lucas was nominated I had some things to say. I wrote letters to senators, reached out to CLA leadership, and talked extensively with other California librarians about the nomination. Now that Lucas has been confirmed I have some more things to say. I cannot overemphasize that I have no negative feelings toward Greg Lucas whatsoever. Although his lack of education and experience in libraries (or anything library-related, or…
  • Reference Question of the Week – 9/14/14

    Swiss Army Librarian
    Brian Herzog
    21 Sep 2014 | 7:47 am
    This ended up being one of those very rare reference questions where initially it seems like a million-to-one shot, and ends up very casually being that one in a million. This email request came to the reference desk: Submitted via Chelmsford Library Reference Question. Comments: Allan Daniel Clark, from (born\in North Clemsford, MA Born june 19, 1924, Father Shirley John - Mother Lela M. Lord Clark Enlisted in the US Navy on jan 27, 1953 at Boston, MA Lost on the submarine USS Swordfish (SS-193) --- This man's photo is needed for use with his published Memorial record in the set of six…
  • Shifting Scholarly Communication Practices and the Case of Dr. Salaita

    ACRLog
    acrlguest
    15 Sep 2014 | 9:00 am
    ACRLog welcomes a guest post from Sarah Crissinger, graduate student in library and information science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Many LIS practitioners are probably already familiar with this story, but here’s a quick recap just in case: In October 2013, Steven Salaita accepted a tenure-track position within the American Indian Studies program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He subsequently quit his job and made arrangements to uproot his family from their home in Virginia. On August 1, 2014, Chancellor Phyllis Wise revoked his offer—an offer…
  • OCLC's Results from the International Linked Data Survey for Implementers

    The Distant Librarian
    Paul R. Pival
    9 Sep 2014 | 8:18 am
    OCLC's Hanging Together blog has just concluded a really interesting series of posts analyzing the responses they got to a recent survey on implementation of linked data projects. If you're at all interested in the semantic web, you really should check out the series: Many thanks to all of you who participated in the international linked data survey for implementers or disseminated the survey link! I’ve been summarizing the results in a series of HangingTogether posts, which just concluded today:  Linked Data Survey results 1 – Who’s doing it Linked Data Survey results 2 –…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    David Lee King

  • Video Gear – Don’t Overdo it!

    David Lee King
    18 Sep 2014 | 6:30 am
    I’m working on a music video for my library right now, so lighting, audio, and video equipment is pretty fresh in my head at the moment (more on that video later). If you make video of any type for your library (and you should be!), here’s something to remember: don’t overdo it. Remember your end-goal. The goal really isn’t a professionally-polished video (although that’s nice). The goal isn’t to have crystal-clear, audiophile-quality sound (although that’s nice). The goal isn’t to have pristine lighting (although, again … that’s nice).
  • Register for this UX Virtual Conference

    David Lee King
    16 Sep 2014 | 6:30 am
    Make sure to register! I’m participating in a really cool virtual conference this Friday focused on UX for libraries. Here’s the info: What: User Experience: Seeing Your Library through the User’s Eyes When: Friday, September 19, 2014 Description: User Experience, or UX, is an increasingly important way of evaluating and informing library practices. UX focuses on knowing about our patrons and understanding their perspectives, then using that to inform everything that libraries do, from our websites to the services we provide to the physical layout of our buildings. Join five…
  • Register for my Facebook Webinar with ALA Techsource

    David Lee King
    11 Sep 2014 | 6:30 am
    If you liked my last post about Facebook Reach, or just want to learn more about how to use Facebook in a library setting, you might like my upcoming webinar! Here are the details: Title: Facebook in the Library: Enhancing Services & Engaging Users When: Wednesday, September 17, 2014 at 2:30pm Eastern/1:30pm Central/12:30pm Mountain/11:30am Pacific (90 minutes long) What: Around 154 million Americans—51 percent of the population—are now using Facebook, according to a recent study by Edison Research. How effectively are you using this direct, free means of communication to reach out…
  • The Drop in Facebook Reach – Is it a Big Deal?

    David Lee King
    9 Sep 2014 | 8:20 am
    What’s the deal with Facebook’s recent drop in Reach? I’ve been reading about it and I don’t think it’s that big of a deal. Read on to find out why! What exactly IS Facebook Reach, and what happened to it? Facebook Reach is a number that reflects how many people saw your Facebook post. Facebook changed something in their algorithm, and Facebook Reach (more specifically, Organic Reach – reach not generated through Facebook Ads) seems to have dropped. Dramatically. Some Facebook Page owners have seen a 40% or more drop in Organic Reach. Bummer! Why is Facebook messing with…
  • Keeping up with my blog – how do I do it?

    David Lee King
    28 Aug 2014 | 6:30 am
    Awhile back, Ned Potter, who writes the fabulous blog at ned-potter.com (you ARE reading his blog, right?) posted What does an online identity REALLY need? (Or, Growing Up Online). I left a comment, because I could relate. Then Ned commented back and asked me a couple of questions. Here’s my answer! But first, here’s Ned’s comment (swiped from his post): David what a great comment! The thing that strikes me with you is the consistency – I don’t know how many subscribers your blog has now but last time I heard a figure it was huge, thousands, and dwarfed mine… And…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Librarian in Black Blog – Sarah Houghton

  • California Library Leadership Failed

    Sarah
    29 Aug 2014 | 11:26 am
    Last Friday, August 22nd, the California State Senate voted unanimously to confirm Governor Brown’s nomination of Greg Lucas as California State Librarian. When Lucas was nominated I had some things to say. I wrote letters to senators, reached out to CLA leadership, and talked extensively with other California librarians about the nomination. Now that Lucas has been confirmed I have some more things to say. I cannot overemphasize that I have no negative feelings toward Greg Lucas whatsoever. Although his lack of education and experience in libraries (or anything library-related, or…
  • Tracking Your Library Users, New from Rosetta Stone!

    Sarah
    8 Jul 2014 | 7:59 am
    These are the days of NSA spying headlines, complaints about companies using and misusing private data to conduct psychological experiments, sell us things, and change the way we engage with politics. I received a tip from a whistle blower that Rosetta Stone’s Library Edition was setting ad tracking cookies (without disclosure or consent) on the personal computers of any library users who used the Library Edition that is offered through their libraries. This applied not only to the full product, but also to any library offering a temporary trial of the product. The source stated that…
  • Day Against DRM: Why Librarians Should Just Say No

    Sarah
    6 May 2014 | 2:05 pm
    Today is International Day Against DRM!  On this day, people and organizations around the world come together to proclaim “hell no!” to Digital Rights Management (AKA Digital Restrictions Management). Learn more about the day and how to take action, small ones and big ones, on the Defective by Design website. And here’s the neat part (to win over librarian hearts). Publishers are participating by offering DRM-free media at a substantial discount: O’Reilly – 50-60% off ebooks Humble Bundle - pay-what-you-want graphic novels No Starch Press - 50% off ebooks…
  • Choose Privacy, ya n00bs!

    Sarah
    5 May 2014 | 4:46 pm
    This week, May 1-7, is Choose Privacy Week. This is the fifth year of Choose Privacy Week (w00t!) and this national public awareness campaign is close to my heart. It’s trying to make people more aware of their personal privacy, what’s being tracked, and what they can do to prevent it.  And we in libraries don’t like tracking one bit, now do we?  This week was established by ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom (no surprise there). Today I attended a great webinar: Defense Against the Digital Dark Arts, put together by ALA and full of awesome information about how…
  • Happy Ehlers-Danlos Awareness Month

    Sarah
    1 May 2014 | 3:30 pm
    May is Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Awareness Month. I have Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.  I will always have it. It doesn’t go away. So, each May, I try to assist in raising awareness of this relatively rare genetic disorder. You can read my posts from previous years (2009, 2011, 2012, 2013) for details on what EDS is and how it has affected my life.  In short, Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome is a connective tissue disorder. My body makes bad collagen–super stretchy, slow to bounce back, slow to heal. And wouldn’t you know it, but collagen is all over your body–skin, internal organs,…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Swiss Army Librarian

  • Reference Question of the Week – 9/14/14

    Brian Herzog
    21 Sep 2014 | 7:47 am
    This ended up being one of those very rare reference questions where initially it seems like a million-to-one shot, and ends up very casually being that one in a million. This email request came to the reference desk: Submitted via Chelmsford Library Reference Question. Comments: Allan Daniel Clark, from (born\in North Clemsford, MA Born june 19, 1924, Father Shirley John - Mother Lela M. Lord Clark Enlisted in the US Navy on jan 27, 1953 at Boston, MA Lost on the submarine USS Swordfish (SS-193) --- This man's photo is needed for use with his published Memorial record in the set of six…
  • Libraries Holding Privacy Literacy Workshops for Patrons

    Brian Herzog
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:38 am
    You may have seen this, but it bears cross-posting: Librarians in Massachusetts are working to give their patrons a chance to opt-out of pervasive surveillance. Partnering with the ACLU of Massachusetts, area librarians have been teaching and taking workshops on how freedom of speech and the right to privacy are compromised by the surveillance of online and digital communications -- and what new privacy-protecting services they can offer patrons to shield them from unwanted spying of their library activity. Read the full article on Boing Boing - please, read it. Good stuff. It's important…
  • Reference Question of the Week – 9/7/14

    Brian Herzog
    13 Sep 2014 | 7:42 am
    This whole interaction made me laugh, but I have to call Spoiler Alert for anyone who hasn't read Be careful what you wish for by Jeffrey Archer - because this question does reveal the ending (I think). A patron called in on a cell phone (with driving noises in the background) asking if there's a book after Archer's Be careful what you wish for. While I'm checking our catalog (which has Novelist Select built into the pages to list books in series order) the patron says [and this is the spoiler], Everybody just blew up and the book ended so there's got to be a sequel. When I get to the record…
  • Another Great Feature for a Library App

    Brian Herzog
    10 Sep 2014 | 5:31 pm
    At the risk of this blog becoming a list of things only interesting to me, here's another cool new-to-me app I just recently learned about. It's called Mr. Silent, and it lets you auto-mute your phone based on time, location, or contact. It seems like a fairly obvious idea, but apparently this one works better than most - it integrates with your phone's calendar, contacts list, and GPS, and has a nice interface. So now see, if I were designing the perfect library app, this feature would definitely be in there. As an opt-in thing, of course, but how nice would it be if people could set their…
  • Reference Question of the Week – 8/31/14

    Brian Herzog
    6 Sep 2014 | 7:59 am
    Earlier this week, a coworker at our circulation desk sent me this message: A patron came to the desk last night and asked where the last 6 months of Skeptical Inquirer were. He said they're never there except the new one. Did we have a blip in circulation? It turns out that this is a bi-monthly magazine, and the issue the patron wanted was checked out. All of our copies were accounted for, but since there are fewer issues than a monthly magazine, it just seemed like more were missing than actually were. But: this patron had doubts and that led him to ask a question - do you know what makes…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    ACRLog

  • Shifting Scholarly Communication Practices and the Case of Dr. Salaita

    acrlguest
    15 Sep 2014 | 9:00 am
    ACRLog welcomes a guest post from Sarah Crissinger, graduate student in library and information science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Many LIS practitioners are probably already familiar with this story, but here’s a quick recap just in case: In October 2013, Steven Salaita accepted a tenure-track position within the American Indian Studies program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He subsequently quit his job and made arrangements to uproot his family from their home in Virginia. On August 1, 2014, Chancellor Phyllis Wise revoked his offer—an offer…
  • Serendipity’s Not Just for the Stacks

    Maura Smale
    8 Sep 2014 | 9:00 am
    The past week or so has been filled with the rush and excitement of the beginning of the academic year, new and returning faculty and students arriving on campus, a huge change from the quiet days of summer. I’ve just finished up a couple of commitments at my college and university that seem quite different at first glance, but have similarities that I find especially interesting at the beginning of a new semester. One is a large collegewide grant that focuses on General Education at the college of technology where I work. A core activity of the grant is an annual professional…
  • We’re Recruiting — Join the ACRLoggers!

    Maura Smale
    2 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    It’s a new academic year, and we’re looking to bring on a few additional bloggers here at ACRLog. Are you a first year or experienced librarian who’s interested in writing about issues that affect academic libraries? Read on for more details! ACRLog Blog Team Members of the ACRLog blog team write on any issue or idea that impacts academic librarianship, from current news items to workflow and procedural topics to upcoming changes in the profession and more. We aim to have group of bloggers who represent diverse perspectives on and career stages in academic librarianship, and who can…
  • First Year Reflections

    Ariana Santiago
    18 Aug 2014 | 10:49 am
    This is my last post for ACRLog, and it’s a little hard to believe so much time has passed already. Not only is it the end of my term as a First Year Academic Librarian Experience writer for ACRLog, but last week marked the one year anniversary from when I started my current job. Looking back on the year, reflecting on what I’ve done and learned, and trying to sum it all up…well, it’s not that easy! I went from not really knowing what to do with my time, to feeling like there weren’t enough hours in the day (and thankfully settled somewhere in the middle).
  • Serenity Now, Insanity Later: why slow summers are only *sort of* a myth

    Chloe Horning
    5 Aug 2014 | 11:47 am
    Some say that the ‘summertime slowdown’ is a myth.  While that may be true for some librarians, I must admit that as I write these words I am taking an hour away from my desk to sit in my favorite campus coffee shop.  Unitasking, no less!  I can’t even imagine being able to do this during the academic year, and I’m grateful. But, as lovely as summer on the UW campus is, always in the back of my mind is a mantra that I heard once in a “Seinfeld” episode: “Serenity Now, Insanity Later!” A brief summer calm before year 2 begins-image courtesy of NOAA Image Archive. By…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Distant Librarian

  • OCLC's Results from the International Linked Data Survey for Implementers

    Paul R. Pival
    9 Sep 2014 | 8:18 am
    OCLC's Hanging Together blog has just concluded a really interesting series of posts analyzing the responses they got to a recent survey on implementation of linked data projects. If you're at all interested in the semantic web, you really should check out the series: Many thanks to all of you who participated in the international linked data survey for implementers or disseminated the survey link! I’ve been summarizing the results in a series of HangingTogether posts, which just concluded today:  Linked Data Survey results 1 – Who’s doing it Linked Data Survey results 2 –…
  • Design presentation for Calgary's New Central Library

    Paul R. Pival
    8 Sep 2014 | 8:22 am
    I ended up not being able to attend this presentation in person, but there's now a nicely-edited video of last week's presentation on the design of Calgary's New Central Library. You can watch the preliminaries, but I recommend starting at the 8:15 mark where the interesting design discussion actually begins, IMHO. 
  • ERIC Webinar: Restoring Access to ERIC's PDFs

    Paul R. Pival
    4 Sep 2014 | 1:17 pm
    In August 2012, ERIC temporarily disabled access to its collection of full text documents due to personally identifiable information found in some of its older documents. Over the past two years, the ERIC team has worked to clear and re-release many of the documents.   ERIC will be hosting a webinar on September 16, 2014 from 1:00–2:30 p.m. EDT to answer many of the questions that have been asked about this process, such as:  Why did ERIC remove access to full text documents? What process did the ERIC team use to restore the PDFs? Why did it take almost two years for ERIC to restore…
  • Open Government Tour 2014 - Calgary Stop

    Paul R. Pival
    3 Sep 2014 | 10:31 am
    Yesterday evening instead of attending the prologue of the 2014 Tour of Alberta as I had planned, I found myself at the Calgary stop of Richard Pietro's Open Government Tour. I totally made the right choice! Over the past year I've found myself increasingly interested in both linked data and civic affairs, and this 3-hour event brought them together in a wonderful way, though it was much more about open data than linked data. I'm not going to attempt to recreate the discussion here, but as much for myself as for anyone else who's interested, I'm going to list the…
  • Thinking the unthinkable - doing away with the library catalogue (UKSG)

    Paul R. Pival
    19 Aug 2014 | 6:56 am
    Here's a thought-provoking talk given by Simone Kortekaas of Utrecht University Library in the Netherlands  at this year's UKSG conference. In it, she talks about how they decided to do away with their discovery tool and steer users to Google Scholar, Web of Science, and Scopus. Utrecht appears to be a science-heavy institution. The title is a bit off, as they do still run their traditional catalogue for now, but still, their statistics showed their users were using tools other than those built by the library, so that's where they focused their efforts. Think you could get…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Pattern Recognition

  • Support the Ada Initiative

    griffey
    10 Sep 2014 | 4:41 am
    Like many librarians, today I’m blogging about a fundraiser for a group that I think does incredibly important and useful work in the technology world: The Ada Initiative. Named after one of my heroes, Ada Lovelace, it is a group that is dedicated to supporting women in technology. They do this in a variety of ways, from advocacy, to the development of codes of conduct and the promotion of safe spaces for women, to education for organizations and individuals about gender diversity and the skills needed to support these efforts. The Ada Initiative can only do these things through the…
  • Apple’s September 9th 2014 Announcement Predictions

    griffey
    8 Sep 2014 | 7:02 am
    Over the years, I’ve become known as a fan of Apple’s hardware and software solutions…and it’s true, I am overly fond of the way they do things. This isn’t to say that I’m not critical of them, as I do think they make mistakes (iPod HiFi anyone?). But I’ve been following them for many, many years and have a good understanding of their predilections. On September 9th, Apple will be holding a press event that is promising to be one of the most interesting in many years. September is always their biggest press event of the year, as it’s when they…
  • LibraryBox UI Translations Needed

    griffey
    3 Sep 2014 | 7:57 pm
    For the last 6 months, I’ve been working on improving the LibraryBox user experience as a part of the Knight Foundation Prototype Grant that the project received. There were a number of improvements that were a part of the initial grant proposal, one of which was localization/internationalization of the interface. If you look at the map of LibraryBox locations… View LibraryBox Locations in a larger map …you can see that it’s a very popular project all around the world. While English may be my mother tongue, we really needed to work to make the interface available in…
  • Directory Layout opinions needed

    griffey
    27 Aug 2014 | 1:22 pm
    Ok, Internet. I have two options, both of which have their upside/downsides, and I need your feedback. I’m working on the new directory layout for LibraryBox, and need to break long names, especially those without spaces in them, because it does crazy things with the layout. Here’s an example of what the layout looks like without the hard-break behavior: Without Hard Break CSS   And here’s the same directory listing, WITH the hard-break CSS behavior in place:   With hard break CSS Better, right? Except then you get weird things like this:   Text with…
  • Creative Commons NC clause and 3D printing

    griffey
    20 Aug 2014 | 2:47 pm
    I was browsing through some 3D printing files today, STLs that both I produced and were produced by others. For example, I designed and uploaded a 3D case for a LibraryBox that others have downloaded and printed. It is CC licensed, specifically CC BY-NC. I was looking at other STL files that had a CC NC license applied to them, and it made me think what that NC is really protecting. Obviously, at the very least, the license prevents others from selling the STL files. Does it, however, prevent someone from using the files to create the physical object (that is, using a 3D printer to print the…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    ResearchBuzz

  • TwitPic, Google, CIA, More: Brief Afternoon Buzz, September 19th, 2014

    Tara Calishain
    19 Sep 2014 | 10:41 am
    (Happy Talk Like a Pirate Day, Mateys!) Twitter is getting more like Facebook and now apparently Facebook is getting more like Twitter. I’m not too chuffed about either of those things. “Facebook wants to steal discussion of real-time events from Twitter and stop being perceived as a slow social network. So today it announced News Feed changes that will surface posts that mention Trending Topics sooner and higher in the feed.” Ready to upgrade to iOS 8? It’s a huge download. Here’s how to handle it. TwitPic has been acquired and will soldier on. The CIA has…
  • Yahoo, Kindle, Music, Mathematica, More: Evening Buzz, September 17th, 2014

    Tara Calishain
    17 Sep 2014 | 3:51 pm
    Bing is predicting the Scotland independence vote. Lifehacker links to a huge list of how to close over 60 online accounts. This list was apparently put together for shutting down accounts when someone passes away, but don’t feel like you need to wait for that unhappy event to dump the account of your choice. From Greenbot: How to use Google Voice with the new Hangouts app. The British Library will digitize fifty more Malay manuscripts. Apparently your Kindle is vulnerable to hacking by dodgy ebooks. And by “hacking,” I mean, “Your account gets stolen.” Amazon,…
  • Minecraft, Egypt, EBSCO, More: Quick Afternoon Buzz, September 116th, 2014

    Tara Calishain
    16 Sep 2014 | 3:15 pm
    Microsoft bought the Minecraft company. And while I’m very happy those folks made bank – they’ve earned it – I worry about the future of the game. Dropbox has released a transparency report. “Dropbox received 268 requests for user information from law enforcement agencies in the first half of 2014, the company has revealed in its updated transparency report.” Web browsing via text message? Why not. If you’re old like me you’ll remember all the services that let you access the Web by e-mail ages ago. (And do Gopher, FTP, etc. Check this out for…
  • Apps, GPO, GIFs, More: Morning Buzz, September 11th, 2014

    Tara Calishain
    11 Sep 2014 | 6:38 am
    From an archiving point of view — physical diaries versus digital calendars. This is “diaries” in the British sense… I think we’d say “appointment books” here in the US. Like something you see on Google Hangouts? Now you can applaud. The first digital library from the GPO depository program has gone live in North Dakota. “The library, part of North Dakota’s Sitting Bull College servicing the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation community, ‘is opting to meet their community’s needs by developing an online government information…
  • Apple, Partpic, Astronomy, More: Afternoon Buzz, September 10th, 2014

    Tara Calishain
    10 Sep 2014 | 11:58 am
    (Hearing from a lot of y’all that Bloglines is down, but I can’t get any info as to why as I write this. If you’ve got the skinny send me a note.) Want to see all the videos Apple played during its live event yesterday? Here ya go. You should not be surprised by this: social media apps have data leaks. “Researchers from the University of New Haven have uncovered a mixed bag of security issues involving the Android apps of a number of popular social media sites including Instagram, Vine, Nimbuzz, OoVoo and Voxer, just to name a few.” Oh wow, Partpic sounds like a…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal» Academic Libraries

  • Keeping Library Content Secure | From the Bell Tower

    Steven Bell
    17 Sep 2014 | 7:42 am
    Illegally breaking into licensed library content doesn’t require sophisticated hacking skills—just a legitimate network account. Higher education recently discovered such accounts for sale on the Internet. Do we have good options for preventing thefts? We see on a fairly regular basis news reports of the latest mass theft of private information. Most recently it was Home Depot that lost millions of credit card account numbers to hackers. Before that it was Target. We wince when we hear the news and check to determine if we were personally victimized by the attack. The increasing…
  • NCSU Libraries Spur Innovation Through Alt-Textbook Grants

    Lisa Peet
    11 Sep 2014 | 10:15 am
    North Carolina State University (NCSU) Libraries has a reputation for innovative practices. This fall, as part of a $10,000 grant program funded by the NC State University Foundation, NCSU Libraries has invited faculty members to develop alternative course materials. The Alt-Textbook Project is a competitive grant for faculty members to develop free or low-cost alternates to traditional textbooks using open source material. All current faculty members who will be teaching in the spring or fall 2015 semesters are eligible to apply. The Libraries’ call for proposals asks applicants to provide…
  • Collective Wisdom in an Age of Algorithms | Peer to Peer Review

    Barbara Fister
    11 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    Changes to platforms we use regularly are always slightly traumatic, as we invariably discover when we roll out a new library website and the complaints begin, or we find out a database interface has changed radically the day we’re introducing it to students. Platform changes are even more distressing when they are sites to which we contribute content. By creating social circles and sharing information on websites, we often forget they belong to other people who have values and motivations different from ours. Those values are not likely to appear in their tagline or mission statement.
  • NYPL and U. Penn Partner for In-Person MOOC Support

    Lisa Peet
    8 Sep 2014 | 11:36 am
    Poets through the ages have managed very well without institutional backing. The study of poetry, on the other hand, requires a little more infrastructure. This fall, the New York Public Library (NYPL) will team up with the University of Pennsylvania’s Kelly Writers House (KWH) to provide a physical space for participants in Professor Al Filreis’s popular massive open online course (MOOC), Modern and Contemporary American Poetry—“ModPo” for short—to meet and discuss class content. Filreis, the Kelly Professor of English in Penn’s School of Arts & Sciences and the founder and…
  • Hard Cases Make Bad Law | Peer to Peer Review

    Kevin L. Smith
    4 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The legal adage that hard cases make bad law apparently has deep roots in English common law, and it was cited in a Supreme Court decision by no less a Justice than Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. Its applicability has been disputed over the years, but in recent weeks we have seen the truth of the maxim illustrated in some copyright debates. Colleagues have recently sent me two different stories where the extremes of copyright law are in play—hard cases, I suppose. Both offer confirmation that when the facts are really well outside the realm of normal expectations, people can draw very bad legal…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal Reviews

  • LibraryReads: Librarians Announce October Favorites

    Kate DiGirolomo
    19 Sep 2014 | 10:15 am
    Below is the latest LibraryReads, listing the October releases that librarians are most excited about. Are you interested in getting involved in LibraryReads, the monthly list of what librarians are loving? No problem! LibraryReads welcomes recommendations from all public library staff members, not just readers’ advisory experts or credentialed librarians. 1. Stein, Garth. A Sudden Light. S. & S. ISBN 9781439187036. $26.95; ebk. ISBN 9781439187050. F “Garth Stein has given us a masterpiece. This beautiful story takes readers on a thrilling exploration of a family estate brimming with…
  • Reading-by-Numbers | Wyatt’s World

    Neal Wyatt
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:04 am
    Perhaps the equivalent of “list-bait” on the Internet, the use of numbers to help readers understand a concept is a tried-and-true method of all manner of explainers—from science writers to journalists to presidents. Here are five books you can count on for elucidation. 41: A Portrait of My Father by George W. Bush (Crown, Nov.). This November, the 43rd president of the United States offers a biography of his father, the 41st president—a man whose life intertwines with many pivotal moments of the 20th century. How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World by Steven…
  • People of the Founding Era; PrivCo | Reference eReviews

    LJ Reviews
    19 Sep 2014 | 6:10 am
    People of the Founding Era: A Prosopographical Approach Rotunda/University of Virginia Press, in collaboration with Documents Compass, a program of the Virginia foundation for the humanities; pfe.rotunda.upress.virginia.edu. To request a free trial, please visit rotunda.upress.virginia.edu/register/default.xqy By Cheryl LaGuardia Content People of the Founding Era: A Prosopographical Approach (PFE) is a digital biographical dictionary funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Its stated goal is “twofold: one is biographical; the other is prosopographical.” For others who, like me, are…
  • Urban Landscapes, Mythic Traditions, Magill’s Medical Guide | Reference Reviews

    LJ Reviews
    19 Sep 2014 | 6:00 am
    Atlas of Cities. Princeton Univ. 2014. 256p. ed. by Paul Knox. illus. maps. bibliog. index. ISBN 9780691157818. $49.50. REF Knox (urban affairs and planning, Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.; Palimpsests: Biographies of 50 City Districts) and 16 other international scholars present an overview of the historical, cultural, demographic, and technological development of selected world metropolises. The principal focus of each topical chapter is a “core” city or cities, with places grouped under umbrella labels: “Foundational” (Athens and Rome); “Networked” (Augsburg,…
  • Alkon on Etiquette, Memoir from McBride, How To Grow Mushrooms, & More | Science & Technology Reviews

    LJ Reviews
    19 Sep 2014 | 6:00 am
    Alkon, Amy. Good Manners for Nice People Who Sometimes Say F*ck. St. Martin’s. 2014. 288p. ISBN 9781250030719. pap. $14.99; ebk. ISBN 9781250030726. ETIQUETTE The main problem with etiquette books is that the people who need them don’t read them. Alkon, who writes the award-winning syndicated column “Ask Amy,” not only tells readers what good manners are but also provides useful suggestions for politely calling offenders’ attention to their rudeness. And she does this in a ferociously funny style—it’s worth a read for the laughs alone. There is nothing here of the proper…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal Reviews» Prepub Alert

  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Maya Angelou: Last Tributes, Last Words

    Barbara Hoffert
    15 Sep 2014 | 8:57 am
    Maya Angelou’s final book, Rainbow in the Cloud: The Wisdom and Spirit of Maya Angelou, will be published next month (Random. 128p. ISBN 9780812996456. $20), but her wisdom and spirit were on abundant display on Friday, September 12, at a celebration cum memorial service held at the soaring Riverside Church on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. The service encompassed musical tributes from recording artist Alyson Williams, South African singer/composer Tsidii Le Loka, and the R&B group Az Yet; a poem from Nikki Giovanni; heartfelt reflections from Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison and Robert…
  • Ian Caldwell, Hanif Kureishi, Thomas McGuane, Mario Vargas Llosa | Barbara’s Picks, Mar. 2015, Pt. 1

    Barbara Hoffert
    14 Sep 2014 | 9:48 pm
    Caldwell, Ian. The Fifth Gospel. S. & S. Mar. 2015. 448p. ISBN 9781451694147. $25.99. LITERARY THRILLER Written with Dustin Thomason, Caldwell’s The Rule of Four spent nearly a year on the New York Times best sellers list. It’s been a ten-year wait for the follow-up, but here it is. In 2004, the curator of a forthcoming under-wraps exhibit at the Vatican Museums is murdered even as his research partner, Greek Catholic priest Father Alex Andreou, suffers a break-in at the Vatican home he shares with his young son. Launching his own investigation, Father Alex begins to see what the…
  • Full-Length Fiction & Short Story Collections, Suspense & Literary Works | Previewing Big Fiction Debuts, Mar. 2015, Pt. 2

    Barbara Hoffert
    14 Sep 2014 | 9:38 pm
    Anolik, Lili. Dark Rooms. Morrow. Mar. 2015. 256p. ISBN 9780062345868. $25.99; ebk ISBN 9780062345882. SUSPENSE Gorgeous, 16-year-old wild girl Nica Baker is murdered, and her older sister refuses to believe that a lonely classmate committed the crime. So she drops out of college to hunt for the real killer, sinking herself into the craziness of Nica’s exclusive New England prep school. You’ve seen Anolik’s work in Vanity Fair, Harper’s, and the Believer; with a 75,000-copy first printing. Barrett, Colin. Young Skins: Stories. Black Cat: Grove. Mar. 2015. 224p. ISBN 9780802123329.
  • Roosevelt, Stalin, & a Daring World War II Prison Camp Rescue | History Previews, Mar. 2015, Pt. 2

    Barbara Hoffert
    14 Sep 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Butler, Susan. Roosevelt and Stalin: Portrait of a Partnership. Knopf. Mar. 2015. 608p. ISBN 9780307594853. $35. HISTORY Having edited My Dear Mr. Stalin, a compilation of the correspondence between Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin, Butler jumps right in with this assessment of their relationship. She uses newly unclassified material from the Russian State Archive, as well as the FDR Library, Library of Congress, Cold War International History Project, and Harvard Houghton Library, to argue for a bond closer than just grudging acceptance. Surprise tidbits: during the war, Stalin…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal Reviews» Reference

  • People of the Founding Era; PrivCo | Reference eReviews

    LJ Reviews
    19 Sep 2014 | 6:10 am
    People of the Founding Era: A Prosopographical Approach Rotunda/University of Virginia Press, in collaboration with Documents Compass, a program of the Virginia foundation for the humanities; pfe.rotunda.upress.virginia.edu. To request a free trial, please visit rotunda.upress.virginia.edu/register/default.xqy By Cheryl LaGuardia Content People of the Founding Era: A Prosopographical Approach (PFE) is a digital biographical dictionary funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Its stated goal is “twofold: one is biographical; the other is prosopographical.” For others who, like me, are…
  • Urban Landscapes, Mythic Traditions, Magill’s Medical Guide | Reference Reviews

    LJ Reviews
    19 Sep 2014 | 6:00 am
    Atlas of Cities. Princeton Univ. 2014. 256p. ed. by Paul Knox. illus. maps. bibliog. index. ISBN 9780691157818. $49.50. REF Knox (urban affairs and planning, Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.; Palimpsests: Biographies of 50 City Districts) and 16 other international scholars present an overview of the historical, cultural, demographic, and technological development of selected world metropolises. The principal focus of each topical chapter is a “core” city or cities, with places grouped under umbrella labels: “Foundational” (Athens and Rome); “Networked” (Augsburg,…
  • Humor Studies, American English, plus Short Takes, & More | Reference Reviews

    LJ Reviews
    5 Sep 2014 | 6:00 am
    history Slave Culture: A Documentary Collection of the Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers’ Project. 3 vols. Greenwood. 2014. 1126p. ed. by Spencer Crew & others. illus. bibliog. index. ISBN 9781440800863. $294; ebk. ISBN 9781440800870. REF Presented here are 4,500 narrative excerpts that were selected from interviews conducted between 1936 and 1938 with the last generation of enslaved African Americans. The set opens with an essay on the history of the accounts and a chronology of slavery in the United States. The pieces that follow are organized by seven themes: community…
  • Facts To Make Your Mouth Drop, Oxford’s Dictionary of Journalism, Contemporary Slang, & More | Reference Reviews

    LJ Reviews
    19 Aug 2014 | 7:45 am
    GENERAL REFERENCE Lloyd, John & others. 1,339 Quite Interesting Facts To Make Your Jaw Drop. Norton. Sept. 2014. 368p. index. ISBN 9780393245608. $15.95; ebk. ISBN 9780393245615. REF While many fact books can be dull, Lloyd and coauthors John Mitchinson and James Harkin, creators of the BBC’s successful Quite Interesting show, offer here a quirky, humorous gem. While the book is impractical, readers will enjoy browsing its pages and will find within many short facts (one to two sentences each) that will impress friends. Among them are the information that an Olympic gold medal is 92.5…
  • Transparent Language Online; Rosetta Stone Library Solution | Reference eReviews

    LJ Reviews
    18 Aug 2014 | 2:36 pm
    Transparent Language Online transparent.com/libraries/language-learning-online.html; request a free trial at that website By Cheryl LaGuardia Content Transparent Language Online (TLO) is a language-learning program that uses the Declarative Method as the approach for learning a new language. According to the company’s website, “Neuroscientists have found that two brain systems—the declarative memory and the procedural memory—enable people to learn, retain, and produce language. Declarative memory collects vocabulary words, phrases, and even short sentences. Procedural memory manages…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal

  • Center for an Urban Future Re-Envisions New York’s Branch Libraries

    Lisa Peet
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:13 am
    From the Andrew Carnegie–era temples of learning to the small cinderblock “Lindsay boxes” built during Mayor John Lindsay’s administration from 1966–1973, New York City’s 207 library branches are as varied as its population. And like much of the city, they are feeling the crunch of budget cuts and neglect. The Center for an Urban Future (CUF), a New York City-based public policy think tank, published a detailed report September 15 titled Re-Envisioning New York’s Branch Libraries. The 56-page report, funded by the Charles H. Revson Foundation, focuses on the physical and…
  • Creating Clear and Simple Signage | Design4Impact

    LJ
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    At California’s Santa Clara County Library District (SCCLD), we have discovered that 48 percent of patrons prefer finding information themselves rather than asking staff members for help. This led us to examine our user experience of signage, particularly for computer use. We wanted to place ­signage in the exact place where patrons need help and ensure it was meaningful in guiding them in their independent use of the library. Ours is a busy library system located in the heart of Silicon Valley, serving 415,000 people in nine cities and the unincorporated county via eight community…
  • The Policy Gap

    The Digital Shift
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    The following is an excerpt from Digital Literacy and Digital Inclusion: Information Policy and the Public Library (Rowman & Littlefield, Aug. All rights reserved.) Federal policies in the United States rely on public libraries to promote digital literacy and digital inclusion. Yet, public libraries are predominantly excluded from the funding made available for digital literacy and digital inclusion, as well as from the decision-making processes. Now in its fifth year, The Digital Shift: Libraries @ the Center virtual conference will focus the attention of library professionals on…
  • National Book Awards’ Second Annual Long-Lists Honor Jane Smiley, Edward O. Wilson, Louise Glück, & More

    Barbara Hoffert
    18 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This week, the National Book Foundation (NBF) announced its long-lists in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people’s literature for the National Book Awards (NBA), featuring books the judges deemed the best works written by a U.S. citizen and published in the United States between December 1, 2013, and November 30, 2014. One list each day was presented over four days, from September 15 to September 18, opening with young people’s literature and culminating with fiction. New to the NBAs just last year, the long-lists have the advantage of “honor[ing] double the number of books”…
  • Frenemies: The Perfect and the Good | Peer to Peer Review

    Rick Anderson
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    We’ve all heard—and many of us have probably invoked ourselves—the admonition “don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.” It’s a concept that has kind of a fraught history in library discourse, because it embodies a tension that exists between two conflicting aspects of library culture: on the one hand, we place a lot of value on accuracy, completeness, and quality in the work that we do; on the other hand, we are painfully aware of the limited resources we have to work with. The tension between these two realities is sometimes expressed in the form of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Journal Reviews» In the Bookroom

  • Betrayals, Bound Feet, Ghosts, and Rollergirls | What We’re Reading

    Liz French
    16 Sep 2014 | 8:26 am
    This week the School Library Journal/LJ staffers learn some things about spycraft, Chinese culture, roller derby doings, imperfect relationships, and growing up in 1970s Texas. Mahnaz Dar, Associate Editor, Reviews, SLJ I recently joined a reading group on modern Chinese fiction at the Center for Fiction, a subscription-based library in midtown Manhattan. My group is reading Mo Yan’s Nobel Prize–winning novel, Red Sorghum (Penguin), an intergenerational look at a family, mostly based around the Second Sino-Japanese War, from the perspective of Chinese peasants. It’s an intense but…
  • Q&A: Ann Hood

    LJ Reviews
    16 Sep 2014 | 6:00 am
    Ann HoodPhoto by Catherine Sebastian Author Ann Hood (The Obituary Writer; Knitting Yarns: Writers on Knitting) tackles the multigenerational family saga with her sumptuous new novel, An Italian Wife (LJ 7/14; ow.ly/AmHW3), released this month. Beginning with an arranged marriage, the book follows sheltered Josephine Rimaldi as she leaves her Italian village to join her husband in America at the beginning of the 20th century. The story of Josephine and her descendants is narrated against the backdrop of war and social and cultural revolutions. In preparing to tell the story of Josephine’s…
  • Q&A: Ann Leckie

    LJ Reviews
    15 Sep 2014 | 6:41 am
    Ann Leckie has been nominated for every sf award imaginable for her debut novel, Ancillary Justice, recently winning both the 2014 Hugo and Nebula Award for Best Novel. That book began the story of Breq, who was once a self-aware but integrated ancillary part of a ship called Justice of Toren. When her vessel is lost, she must decide how to exist alone and find something worth living for, even if it’s revenge. Breq’s journey continues in Ancillary Sword (LJ 9/15/14, p. 52.), out this October. I love the complexity of the Radch culture and was particularly intrigued by their concept (or…
  • Old and New Friends Board the Mothership | What We’re Reading

    Liz French
    9 Sep 2014 | 2:05 pm
    This week we welcome two new contributors to “What We’re Reading,” Lisa Peet, who is a brand-new addition to the staff, and Brad Crosby, who’s been with us since the summer, quietly reading away. They’ve joined the gang of reader-expounders at School Library Journal and LJ and we couldn’t be happier to have them aboard the WWR mothership. Brad Crosby, Webcast Program Manager, LJS I just started Isaac Asimov’s Prelude to Foundation (Bantam Spectra). I haven’t read any Asimov, but I’ve seen the Will Smith movie, I Am Robot (Err…I, Robot?—the one with all the robots, not…
  • A Case for Poirot: On Tackling Agatha Christie’s Most Perfect Creation

    LJ Reviews
    9 Sep 2014 | 6:15 am
    Sophie HannahPhoto by Phillipa Gedge Since it was announced last September that I was to write a new novel (The Monogram Murders, LJ 9/1/14, p. 83) starring Agatha Christie’s famous detective Hercule Poirot, I have been asked the same question hundreds of times, though the wording has varied: “How are you going to change him? What will you do with him? Are you going to give him a love life/a pet donkey/a Taiwanese girlfriend?” No. Or, as Poirot would say, Non. I can see why people ask, of course. Many people, understandably, can’t work out why any writer would want to write a novel…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Annoyed Librarian

  • Those Sledgehammering Librarians

    Annoyed Librarian
    18 Sep 2014 | 3:00 am
    Sometimes I feel sorry for library school students who want to become librarians. It’s not just the lack of good jobs available for graduates. Sure, it’s annoying that so many people get tricked into going to library school by idiots who keep claiming there’s a librarian shortage when there’s never a librarian shortage. It’s not [...]
  • Those Pivoting Librarians

    Annoyed Librarian
    15 Sep 2014 | 3:00 am
    It’s almost as if Forbes deliberately pays people to write stuff about libraries that annoys me. If so, I want to thank them, because the Annoyed Librarian always needs stuff to be annoyed about. This time it’s an advertisement for something called Easybib in the form of an article about pivoting librarians. One of the [...]
  • If CDPs Told the Truth

    Annoyed Librarian
    11 Sep 2014 | 3:00 am
    In my last post, I suggested that librarians were being hypocritical about the political nature of their jobs and hiding behind collection development policies (CDPs) that our earnest homophobic crusader claimed were basically just aids to “banning” certain kinds of books librarians don’t like. Because the ALA’s arguments about intellectual freedom and diversity and censorship [...]
  • Another Problem with Banned Books Talk

    Annoyed Librarian
    8 Sep 2014 | 3:00 am
    One of the many problems with the ALA approach to so-called banned books is that it opens the door to easy criticisms by raging homophobes like this person. The general gist of the criticism is that while librarians talk a good game about intellectual freedom and are against “censorship” and “banning books,” in fact their [...]
  • The Myth that Won’t Die

    Annoyed Librarian
    4 Sep 2014 | 3:00 am
    The good news is that according to Wired Magazine your local library will probably have a makerspace soon, because it’s not just cutting edge cities like Chattanooga and Cleveland that will have them. A recent survey “found that 109 libraries in the US had a makerspace or were close to opening one.” Since there are [...]
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    In the Library with the Lead Pipe

  • Open for Business – Why In the Library with the Lead Pipe is Moving to CC-BY Licensing

    Editorial Board
    10 Sep 2014 | 3:30 am
    Blown Away, CC-BY felixtsao (Flickr). In brief: Lead Pipe is changing our licensing from CC-BY-NC to CC-BY. Here, we explain why. In the Library with the Lead Pipe has, since we began publishing in 2008, been run by volunteers with a desire to spread ideas for positive change as widely as possible. For this reason, we have required that all articles are published under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial (CC BY-NC 3.0 US) license. Publishing under a CC BY-NC license has always been viewed by Lead Pipe as a way of balancing our commitment to authors (by ensuring they retain their…
  • Call for Social Media Editor

    Ellie Collier
    27 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    In the Library with the Lead Pipe is seeking applications for a Social Media Editor. This volunteer position will serve on the Lead Pipe Editorial Board for a two-year term of service. Lead Pipe is an open access, open peer reviewed journal founded and run by an international team of librarians working in various types of libraries. In addition to publishing articles and editorials by Editorial Board members, Lead Pipe publishes articles by authors representing diverse perspectives including educators, administrators, library support staff, technologists, and community members. Lead Pipe…
  • Call for Articles

    Editorial Board
    13 Aug 2014 | 3:00 am
    We’ve just finalized revamping our publication process documentation. Now that the new documentation is live we thought it was a good time to post another call for articles. What We Publish We publish high quality peer-reviewed articles in a range of formats. Whilst we are open to suggestions for new article types and formats, including material previously published in part or full, we expect proposals to include unique and substantial new content from the author. Examples of material we would publish include: Original research with a discussion of its consequences and an argument for…
  • Announcing In the Library with the Lead Pipe’s Community Code of Conduct

    Ellie Collier
    30 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    The Editorial Board is pleased to announce In the Library with the Lead Pipe’s adoption of a Code of Conduct. By doing so, we hope to protect the members of our community from harassing behaviors in Lead Pipe spaces, including this website, our social media spaces, and any other Lead Pipe-sponsored spaces. As of today, everyone participating in Lead Pipe spaces is expected to comply with the Code of Conduct (copied below and also linked in the top navigation bar). Reported violations of the Code of Conduct will be handled by members of the Lead Pipe Editorial Board. You can contact us at…
  • Open Source Outline: Locating the Library within Institutional Oppression

    Ellie Collier
    16 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    In Brief: A call for articles based on an open source outline On January 20th, 2014 nina de jesus posted “Outline for a Paper I Probably Won’t Write.” The editors at In the Library with the Lead Pipe approached de jesus to see if she might like to write it after all. We also discussed her idea to release her outline with an open source license and see what others would write. We are thrilled to announce that de jesus agreed to both. If you are interested in writing an article for us based on this outline and would like to work with a Lead Pipe editor, please email…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    OEDB.org

  • 15 Free Technologies for Libraries

    Ellyssa Kroski
    18 Sep 2014 | 6:53 am
    This morning I’ll be presenting at the SLA-NY conference on 15 Free Technologies for Libraries. I’ve been using each of these technologies for a number of years and currently use them in my library and for teaching. Here’s my entire presentation:     The post 15 Free Technologies for Libraries appeared first on OEDB.org.
  • 25 Great Resources for Breaking into Academic Publishing

    Ellyssa Kroski
    16 Sep 2014 | 11:03 am
    This is a roundup post filled with articles, videos, and even Pinterest boards with tips on how to get published in the academic world.  Are you a first-time or aspiring author?  These resources will provide you with strategic advice for breaking into the academic publishing arena. Ten Publishing Tips for Young Academics How To Publish Your Ideas: Some Tips For Academic Publishing How to get ahead in academic publishing: Q&A best bits Advice for Authors, Reviewers, Publishers, and Editors of Literary Scholarship Tips on Getting Published Academic publishing advice from the London School…
  • Polling the Classroom: 4 Free Polling Tools to Keep Students Engaged

    Ellyssa Kroski
    11 Sep 2014 | 11:24 am
    Each semester I try to incorporate interactive tools into my teaching to keep my students engaged and interested. One such technology that I found free and easy to use for all involved was polling software. Last semester, I held a “game show” night in which I challenged my students on their knowledge of the library indexes and databases that they learned about the week before. Winners of each poll question received a prize in the form of chocolate, candy, or some sort of fun trinket I picked up at Party City before class. The class was a huge success – not only did my…
  • 48 Library Stories You May Have Missed in August

    Ellyssa Kroski
    9 Sep 2014 | 11:54 am
    The last month of the summer was chock-full of library and information stories ranging from articles about special collections, eBooks, library robots, and Legos to digital citizinship, makerspaces, and gamified instruction!  Check out these 48 posts, infographics, and articles to get you caught up on what’s happening in the LIS world. 10 books about libraries and librarians 15 incredibly specific special collections 13 Resources to Help You Make the Most of the Workday 10 Remarkably Free Digital Tools for Educators and Students 10 Best Wearable Tech Devices for Back to School 7 Things…
  • Stay Focused! 5 Tools to Avoid Distractions

    Ellyssa Kroski
    4 Sep 2014 | 5:00 am
    It’s that time of year again when we all need to get back on track and start to get focused.  But with all of the many distractions online that can prove difficult.  Here are five applications that can help. FocusTime Cost: $4.99 Device Compatibility: Phone, iPad and Mac The Pomodoro Technique is a productivity method in which you break down tasks into 25 minute sessions or pomodori during which you work solely on that task and then take a 3-5 minute break once the time period is complete. Following 4 pomodori a longer break of 15-30 minutes is taken. The FocusTime app supports those…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Library Stuff

  • 100,000 Digitized Art History Materials from the Getty Research Institute Now Available in the Digital Public Library of America

    Steven M. Cohen
    19 Sep 2014 | 6:40 am
    “We are thrilled to announce a new partnership with the Digital Public Library of America. Launched in April 2013, the DPLA brings together millions of digitized books, artworks, and rare documents from American libraries, archives, and museums. Our collaboration has begun with nearly 100,000 records for digital images and texts from the Getty Research Institute’s Library and Special Collections, which contain a vast trove of rare and unique materials for the study of visual culture. In this work we join 20 other partners including the New York Public Library, the Smithsonian, and our…
  • Book ignites controversy at Oregon board meeting

    Steven M. Cohen
    19 Sep 2014 | 5:50 am
    “The story of a young woman growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution ignited controversy at an Oregon school board meeting. Some parents complained Tuesday night that students should not be allowed to read the book “Persepolis” without parental approval. The novel by Marjane Satrapi contains coarse language and scenes of torture, and it’s in high school libraries within the Three Rivers School District in southwest Oregon.” (via AP)
  • Odilo raises $2.8M to help libraries lend books digitally

    Steven M. Cohen
    18 Sep 2014 | 8:36 am
    “Odilo, a startup aiming to modernize brick-and-mortar libraries with digital lending services and inventory tech, today announced a $2.8 million funding round (€2.2M) led by Active Venture Partners. Based in Spain and the U.S., Odilo says its new funds will be used to “accelerate expansion” in Latin America and the U.S. The three-year-old company claims to already allow “more than 5 million users to access digital content offered by their libraries, schools, universities, professional associations, corporations or municipalities.” (via
  • Don’t overlook your school librarian, they’re the unsung heroes of literacy

    Steven M. Cohen
    18 Sep 2014 | 6:05 am
    “When talking about teaching and learning, most people don’t immediately think of librarians. But in a school where the librarian or learning resource centre manager is valued and properly made use of, we can teach important skills. Librarians are in the privileged position of being able to work with teachers across all subjects and students of all ages, observing the inner workings of a school from a slight distance.” (via Guardian Professional)
  • The Great Library Way

    Steven M. Cohen
    18 Sep 2014 | 6:03 am
    “I bet you didn’t know that the New York Public Library is celebrating the 10th anniversary of Library Way this month. You may have no idea where it’s even located. Library Way extends from Park to Fifth avenues along 41st Street. And it’s distinguished by 44 bronze sidewalk plaques featuring quotes from the likes of Ernest Hemingway, Emily Dickinson, Julia Alvarez, Mark Twain and Tom Stoppard. There are actually 98 plaques, according to library spokeswoman Amy Geduldig—an equal number on both sides of 41st Street that are identical to each other. I have to take her…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The 'M' Word - Marketing Libraries

  • Library Communications Conference, Oct. 6 & 7, 2014

    ~Kathy Dempsey
    17 Sep 2014 | 5:02 pm
    In case you haven't heard, there will be a Library Communications Conference in Mount Laurel, New Jersey (USA) on October 6-7, 2014. According to the organizers, "This conference will focus exclusively on the best practices of library communications and outreach, and will feature over 20 relevant workshops and keynote addresses by nationally recognized speakers Kathy Dempsey, Dr. Curtis Rogers, and Angela Montefinise."Here's a PDF of the details & sessions. The event is being organized by the Library Management Institute (LMI), the same group that originally created ALCOP…
  • North Logan Shows the Power of Public Libraries

    ~Kathy Dempsey
    17 Aug 2014 | 11:05 am
    Nancy found this short video that shows what great public libraries can be in their communities...Kudos to the North Logan Library in Cache Valley, Utah on the amazing work it's doing and on the way it's publicizing that to keep growing. If you have a video that you're proud of, give us the link in a comment. Share your great work!The M Word Blog teaches your library and non-profit tips, tricks, and trends of the marketing trade.
  • Can You Express Your Library's Value?

    ~Kathy Dempsey
    21 Jul 2014 | 3:04 pm
    Everywhere I look, I see librarians complaining that people are saying things like, "Why do we still need libraries?" They lament that stakeholders and elected officials don't understand what libraries are really all about.OK, well: How will people know unless we tell them? Every single librarian, Friend, Trustee, and supporter needs to have an answer, an elevator speech, or a comeback, for these questions. What would be even better is if you didn't wait for the question, but rather, proactively told people about the value of libraries in the 21st century. You may think the need for libraries…
  • Fun with Governmental Advocacy

    ~Kathy Dempsey
    10 Jul 2014 | 7:37 am
    Kathy Dempsey (left) with Stephanie VanceFrom ALA in Las Vegas: While attending a session run by the very knowledgeable Stephanie Vance, I volunteered to be a mock presidential candidate. My pitch beat the other 2 "candidates" (according to the unscientific "applause-o-meter"), making me president of the room! We were given copies of one of Vance's books for our efforts. I definitely recommend getting Citizens In Action: A Guide to Influencing Government or any of her other books if you want to know how to win support from government representatives.The M Word Blog teaches your library and…
  • Thing 1 & Thing 2

    ~Kathy Dempsey
    21 Jun 2014 | 7:08 am
    City Council meetings can be pretty boring. But this one in Dallas,Texas wasn't.This meeting is chock full of effective library advocacy. In fact, the council members will probably remember these particular funding pleas for a long time.If you only watch the first 3 minutes, you'll get the greatest stuff. Two library supporters rewrote Dr. Seuss' story about Thing 1 and Thing 2, who are looking for something to do. If council raised the library budget, they stated, then the public library could be open more hours, and all the local Things would be occupied and happy. The rewritten rhyme was…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Stephen's Lighthouse

  • The Social-Media Demographics Report: Differences In Gender, Age, And Income At The Top Networks

    Stephen Abram
    21 Sep 2014 | 3:47 am
    The Social-Media Demographics Report: Differences In Gender, Age, And Income At The Top Networks “Here are a few of the key takeaways from the BI Intelligence report: Facebook still skews significantly female. Women in the U.S. are more likely to use Facebook than men by about 10 percentage points, according to a 2013 survey of social network adoption. Facebook remains the top social network for U.S. teens. Nearly half of teen Facebook users say they’re using the site more than last year, and Facebook has more daily teen users than any other social network. That said, Instagram…
  • Summary: 6 tech adoption trends from the NMC Horizon Report 2014 Library Edition

    Stephen Abram
    21 Sep 2014 | 3:45 am
    6 tech adoption trends from the NMC Horizon Report 2014 Library Edition ‘The first library-dedicated NMC Horizon Report was published in August 2014. It outlines key trends, challenges, developments and technologies to impact on academic and research libraries between now and the next 5 years and beyond. This month’s blog entry brings together some of the main key findings in the area of technology adoption trends and important developments for those wanting a short taster before they read the full-length report. Challenges impeding technology adoption will appear in a future…
  • Phablet Sales To Top Laptops This Year, Tablets in 2015

    Stephen Abram
    21 Sep 2014 | 3:24 am
    Phablet Sales To Top Laptops This Year, Tablets in 2015 http://thejournal.com/articles/2014/09/04/phablet-sales-to-top-mobile-laptops-this-year-tablets-in-2015.aspx   iCharts   Stephen
  • Getting a drone’s-eye view of the Toronto Reference Library

    Stephen Abram
    20 Sep 2014 | 2:58 pm
    On September 19, 2014, we celebrate the completion of our re:vitalization project. Come re:discover your Toronto Reference Library.http://www.tpl.ca/rediscovertrl Stephen
  • 9 great books on library marketing

    Stephen Abram
    20 Sep 2014 | 3:53 am
    9 great books on library marketing Via CILIP: http://www.cilip.org.uk/cilip/blog/9-great-library-marketing-books Building a buzz: Libraries and Word-of-Mouth Marketing Barber, Peggy, and Linda Wallace. Building a Buzz: Libraries and Word-of-Mouth Marketing. Chicago: American Library Association, 2010. ISBN: 9278-0-83891-011-5. Crash Course in Marketing for Libraries Alman, Susan Webreck. Crash Course in Marketing for Libraries. Crash Course Series. Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited, 2007. ISBN: 978-1-59158-430-8. Creating your library brand Doucett, Elisabeth. Creating Your Library Brand:…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Tame The Web

  • Thanks SEFLIN! The Future of UX in Libraries: Learning Everywhere

    Michael
    19 Sep 2014 | 6:22 am
    Thanks to all at SEFLIN and all who attended my keynote  session this morning. The slides are here: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/239835/SEFLINStephensUXLearning.pdf Information about the conference: https://netforum.avectra.com/eweb/DynamicPage.aspx?Site=SEFLIN&WebCode=2014virtconf  
  • 4th Year Dossier Complete!

    Michael
    18 Sep 2014 | 5:58 pm
    I can’t believe it’s already my fourth year at the School of Information at San Jose State University. This is my 4th year dossier. It grew out of the one binder I turned in 2 years ago! It’s all about the tabs!  
  • Upcoming Presentations Fall 2014

    Michael
    7 Sep 2014 | 3:05 pm
    September 19:  Opening Session: “The Future of UX in Libraries: Learning Everywhere.” SEFLIN Virtual Conference UX: Seeing Your Library Through the User’s Eyes. October 8: “The Hyperlinked Library” COSLINE 2014 Library Development Directors Conclave, Cape May, New Jersey. October 10: Plenary Session: “Driving Change, Creating Experience, Moving Forward.” West Virginia Library Association, Snowshoe Mountain, West Virginia. October 13: Presentation for West Virginia University Library in Morgantown, West Virginia. October 23: Keynote:…
  • Behind the Scenes of the Graphic Novel Symposium: by TTW Contributor Troy Swanson

    troyswanson
    28 Aug 2014 | 12:18 pm
    Our college’s design team has been doing a series of videos on our library’s upcoming Graphic Novel Symposium. (I posted video 1 back in May and video 2 in June.) Our library is fortunate to have such talented individuals who make us look good. Learn more about the Symposium at our website. Behind the Scenes: Graphic Novel Symposium Event Planning —- Troy A. Swanson is Department Chair and Teaching & Learning Librarian at Moraine Valley Community College. He is the co-editor of the upcoming book from ACRL, Not Just Where to Click: Teaching Students How to Think About…
  • It’s Here! The NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Edition #NMChz

    Michael
    20 Aug 2014 | 12:17 am
    From Michael: Download the new NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Edition. I served on the expert panel to select the topics: go.nmc.org/2014arl  The New Media Consortium (NMC) in collaboration with the University of Applied Sciences (HTW) Chur, the German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB), Hannover, and ETH-Bibliothek Zurich are releasing the NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Edition at a special session of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) World Library and Information Congress 80th General Conference and Assembly. This is…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Information Wants To Be Free

  • Living essentially

    Meredith Farkas
    11 Sep 2014 | 5:58 am
    “What do I feel deeply inspired by?” and “What am I particularly talented at?” and “What meets a significant need in the world?” Greg McKeownEssentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less So I’m reading this book, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less and it’s not really that great a book (in fact, I nearly shut the book after the first unrealistic “case study”), but it’s gotten me thinking a lot about what I spend my time on. Here’s a description of the book: The Way of the Essentialist isn’t about getting more done in less time.
  • Free and Cheap Technologies to Supercharge Your Teaching

    Meredith Farkas
    3 Sep 2014 | 10:02 am
    Just gave a fun whirlwind instructional technology talk and I wanted to provide the slides and links below for the attendees (and anyone else who’s interested). Slides: Links: Tools for Point of Need and/or Mobile Instruction Library DIY ARIS QR Codes QR Codes Video Demo QR Code Generators Kaywa QR Stuff QR Code Readers Kaywa Quickmark Beetagg QR Code Treasure Hunt Generator Where in the Library is Carmen Sandiego? Gamification and Badges HML-IQ Passport scvngr NCSU Libraries Mobile Scavenger Hunt Tools for Synchronous Online Instruction Google Hangouts Skype ooVoo join.me Tools for…
  • Reflections on library assessment and the Library Assessment Conference

    Meredith Farkas
    22 Aug 2014 | 11:22 am
    I wanted to write about the Library Assessment Conference as soon as I returned, but unfortunately, life got in the way. I got barely a week and a half before I was set to leave my job and, not surprisingly, there was a lot of wrapping up of projects and getting things to a good place to hand them over to colleagues. My last day was August 15th and after spending six days riding bikes in Sunriver, Oregon, I finally have some time to take a breath and reflect. I went to the Library Assessment Conference two years ago, and for some reason, spent most of the time feeling like I should be…
  • On tenure, after three years on the tenure track

    Meredith Farkas
    23 Jul 2014 | 6:15 am
    Way back in 2005, I wrote a post about tenure for librarians in which I argued against it. Since then, I’ve spent six years as a librarian with faculty rank and no tenure and three years as a librarian on the tenure track, and I can say that my feelings against tenure status for librarians has only grown stronger. When I told one of my colleagues that I was leaving for Portland Community College, she said “are you sad you’re not going to be doing scholarship anymore?” Why wouldn’t I? Portland Community College already has 3 Library Journal Movers and Shakers…
  • Taking a new path in a familiar place

    Meredith Farkas
    2 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    Lisa Hinchliffe and I are currently analyzing data from a survey looking at factors that facilitate the creation of an assessment culture in community college libraries (it’s a sister study to the one we did with Amy Harris Houk on four-year and above schools reported on in C&RL). We’ll be presenting the results at the Library Assessment Conference in Seattle in August. I’m not going to give away any big results here, but I will say that those of us at BA, MA and PhD-granting schools can learn a lot from community colleges about building a culture of assessment and a…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    What I Learned Today...

  • Bookmarks for September 9, 2014

    Nicole C. Engard
    9 Sep 2014 | 1:30 pm
    Today I found the following resources and bookmarked them on <a href= Color Oracle Color Oracle is a free color blindness simulator for Window, Mac and Linux. Digest powered by RSS Digest The post Bookmarks for September 9, 2014 appeared first on What I Learned Today.... Related posts: Another Satisfied Customer Amazon’s bestselling laptop is open source! September Workshops
  • Bookmarks for August 23, 2014

    Nicole C. Engard
    23 Aug 2014 | 1:30 pm
    Today I found the following resources and bookmarked them on <a href= Open Source Game Clones This site tries to gather open-source reimplementations of great old games in one place. Digest powered by RSS Digest The post Bookmarks for August 23, 2014 appeared first on What I Learned Today.... Related posts: Role Playing Games and Libraries Games & Meebo My Famous Hubby
  • Bookmarks for August 19, 2014

    Nicole C. Engard
    19 Aug 2014 | 1:31 pm
    Today I found the following resources and bookmarked them on <a href= Beautiful Open Beautiful Open is a showcase of sites for open source projects that have been well designed. It’s built and curated by @trek. Digest powered by RSS Digest The post Bookmarks for August 19, 2014 appeared first on What I Learned Today.... Related posts: Evaluating Open Source Google Sites for All Open Source Runs the Web
  • Bookmarks for August 4, 2014

    Nicole C. Engard
    4 Aug 2014 | 1:30 pm
    Today I found the following resources and bookmarked them on <a href= BorrowLenses Rent camera bodies, lenses, lighting kits, and more Digest powered by RSS Digest The post Bookmarks for August 4, 2014 appeared first on What I Learned Today.... Related posts: Digital Cameras – I’m up for Suggestions Camera Finder – Part 2
  • Bookmarks for August 3, 2014

    Nicole C. Engard
    3 Aug 2014 | 1:30 pm
    Today I found the following resources and bookmarked them on <a href= SumAll A powerful data analytics tool that allows our customers to view all of their data in one simple, easy-to-use visualization. Social media, e-commerce, advertising, e-mail, and traffic data all come together to provide a complete view of your activity. Digest powered by RSS Digest The post Bookmarks for August 3, 2014 appeared first on What I Learned Today.... Related posts: Bug Me Not Web Design Commercial Permalinks in Gmail
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    LJ INFOdocket

  • FCC Publishes K-12 School Connectivity Profiles For 13 States

    Gary Price
    21 Sep 2014 | 9:46 am
    The document containing the 12 profiles (embedded below) was released on Friday. Sections on Internet speeds, library connectivity, funding, etc. State School Connectivity Profiles (FCC)
  • Encyclopaedia Britannica Sees Digital Growth, Aims to Draw New Users

    Gary Price
    20 Sep 2014 | 9:46 am
    A recent Chicago Tribune article that has been syndicated to a number of newspapers. From the Article: Chicago-based Encyclopaedia Britannica, which shelved its venerable print edition in favor of a digital-only version more than two years ago, is looking to reclaim its legacy as the household reference of choice. [Clip] Some 50,000 households pay $70 annually and an additional 450,000 get full access through distribution partners such as telecom companies and Internet providers, a subscriber base that has remained stable despite the chipping away of the pay wall, Cauz said. Meanwhile, online…
  • New Research Article: “A Survey of Graphic Novel Collection and Use in American Public Libraries”

    Gary Price
    20 Sep 2014 | 8:45 am
    The following article was published online in the past week. It appears in the new issue of Evidence Based Library and Information Practice. Title A Survey of Graphic Novel Collection and Use in American Public Libraries Author Edward Francis Schneider University of South Florida Source Evidence Based Library and Information Practice Abstract Objective – The objective of this study was to survey American public libraries about their collection and use of graphic novels and compare their use to similar data collected about video games. Methods – Public libraries were identified and…
  • New Article: “Meeting the Needs of the ‘Invisible University:’ Identifying Information Needs of Postdoctoral Scholars in the Sciences”

    Gary Price
    19 Sep 2014 | 1:42 pm
    The following refereed article appears in the latest issue of Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship. Title Meeting the Needs of the ‘Invisible University:’ Identifying Information Needs of Postdoctoral Scholars in the Sciences Author Nirmala Gunapala New Mexico State University Library Source Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship Summer 2014 Abstract Academic libraries seek to play a central role in supporting the research enterprise on their campuses. Postdoctoral scholars (“postdocs”) make substantial contributions to academic research and are an…
  • The European Library Joins the European Data Infrastructure – EUDAT

    Gary Price
    19 Sep 2014 | 1:02 pm
    From The European Library: A subset of The European Library Open Dataset is now accessible through EUDAT’s research data discovery service – B2FIND, which will be presented during the 3rd EUDAT Conference taking place on 24-25 of September in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The first European Library subset distributed to EUDAT consists of a selection of data of interest to research communities. EUDAT’s mission is to design, develop, implement and offer Common Data Services to interested research communities. EUDAT represents a unique partnership between research communities and…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    ALM RSS Feeds

  • Travel Grants for San Francisco

    MPERA
    17 Sep 2014 | 2:07 pm
    Tags: travel grantsalamw15midwinter2015
  • Children in Crisis

    geberhart
    17 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    Sylvia Cisneros, president of Reforma: The National Association to Promote Library and Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish Speaking, delivered 225 Spanish-language children’s books to the Rio Grande Processing Center in McAllen, Texas, September 10, as part of the organization’s effort to help meet the social and emotional needs of unaccompanied children from Central America seeking refuge in the United States.
  • The Way I See It

    MPERA
    17 Sep 2014 | 6:47 am
    Tags: schneider family book awards
  • The Case for 3D Printing

    geberhart
    16 Sep 2014 | 3:00 pm
  • Honoring Excellence and Leadership in the Library Profession

    MPERA
    15 Sep 2014 | 6:46 am
    Tags: ala awards2014 awardslemony snicketschneider family book awards
Log in